2009
DOI: 10.1075/bct.20.06pym
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Natural and directional equivalence in theories of translation

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Cited by 24 publications
(26 citation statements)
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“…Our paper is structured in accordance with these steps. We commence by critically reviewing what, following Pym (2007), we term the 'equivalence paradigm', which has dominated existing literature on cross-language research methodology in IB. According to this approach, translation is the quest for conveying identical meanings.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our paper is structured in accordance with these steps. We commence by critically reviewing what, following Pym (2007), we term the 'equivalence paradigm', which has dominated existing literature on cross-language research methodology in IB. According to this approach, translation is the quest for conveying identical meanings.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One of the characteristics that sets functionalism apart from earlier models in translation studies is that it moves away from the central-yet highly controversial (cf. Pym, 2009)-concept of equivalence that formed the basis of most earlier models, positing instead that the purpose or intended function of the target text should take precedence in the translation process. Defining the concept of equivalence, which was already difficult enough for interlingual translation (cf.…”
Section: Audio Description and The Broader Field Of Translation Studiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As such, it is ater a ST has been rendered into a target language that we can talk about translation and, therefore, equivalence. Directional equivalence is created by the translator, as opposed to the natural equivalence advocated for within the linguistic paradigm, and whereby correspondence was ideally conceived prior to two languages being engaged in an act of translation (Pym 2007). If we accept that equivalence is created by translators, its analysis demands the examination of actual language use.…”
Section: Cross-linguistic Similarity and Equivalencementioning
confidence: 99%