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Cited by 460 publications
(360 citation statements)
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References 45 publications
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“…When required to identify the emotions depicted in video vignettes, adults with NF1 displayed significantly poorer recognition of anger compared to healthy controls. Contrary to expectations, correlational analyses in the NF1 group failed to reveal a significant relationship between emotion recognition performance and total gray matter volume in the amygdala, a region strongly associated with negative emotion processing in neurotypical individuals and other clinical populations (e.g., Adams, Gordon, Baird, Ambady, & Kleck, 2003; Phan, Fitzgerald, Nathan, & Tancer, 2006; Whalen et al, 2001). Nevertheless, a nonsignificant trend was observed whereby larger gray matter volume in the left fusiform gyrus was associated with poorer overall emotion recognition in those with NF1.…”
contrasting
confidence: 96%
“…Youth with GAD exhibited greater right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex activation than healthy peers, with no between-group differences in the amygdala. Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex activation was greater in youth having GAD with mild anxiety relative to those with severe anxiety, consistent with studies 15,[25][26][27] implicating the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in emotion regulation through effects on the amygdala. However, as with most prior reports, this study 4 involved events containing prolonged presentation of threats.…”
Section: Igilance For Threat Rep-supporting
confidence: 82%
“…Such studies consistently find that adults with various anxiety disorders exhibit altered activation in the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, [14][15][16][17][18][19] with positive correlations between amygdala activation and anxiety severity. 15 These studies typically present threats under prolonged viewing conditions in which the nature of the threat can be readily discerned. Prior research implicates the amygdala and associated circuitry in processing rapidly presented threats.…”
Section: Igilance For Threat Rep-mentioning
confidence: 87%
“…Previous work has reported increased amygdala response in patients with GSP to facial expressions 4,5,11. In the current study, we found similarly increased amygdala BOLD response in the patients with GSP relative to the HCs to self-referential criticism, another class of social stimuli.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 80%
“…Previous work implicates emotion-relevant hyperresponsiveness in GSP for one class of social stimuli, facial expressions 4-6,8,9,11,36. Specifically, research shows that GSP involves greater responding than in healthy subjects to a variety of facial expressions, including negative (harsh, angry, fearful, or disgusted),4-6,8,9,11 positive,8 and neutral5,10 expressions.…”
Section: Commentmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Neuroimaging studies have consistently reported that facial expressions particularly of negative emotions, i.e. anger, disgust and fear result in enhanced amygdala responses in people with social phobia compared with healthy controls (Blair et al, 2008;Phan, 2006;Stein, Goldin, Sareen, Zorrilla, & Brown, 2002;Straube, Kolassa, Glauer, Mentzel, & Miltner, 2004). As in our study these studies also report no differences in the accuracy of the identification of emotions (Phan, 2006).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 70%
“…anger, disgust and fear result in enhanced amygdala responses in people with social phobia compared with healthy controls (Blair et al, 2008;Phan, 2006;Stein, Goldin, Sareen, Zorrilla, & Brown, 2002;Straube, Kolassa, Glauer, Mentzel, & Miltner, 2004). As in our study these studies also report no differences in the accuracy of the identification of emotions (Phan, 2006). This would suggest that despite there being no differences in the explicit evaluation of expressions the viewing of facial expressions in individuals with social phobia results in different effects in the brain compared with healthy controls particularly in areas associated with the evaluation of threat.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 44%
“…Reutter et al (2017) found enhanced N2pc correlated with increased social anxiety. Assuming the N2pc reflects theta oscillations in the visual cortex, which is mediated by theta oscillations in the amygdala, it is no surprise that fMRI research has found hyperactivation of the amygdala when viewing negative facial expressions in patients with generalized social phobia (Phan et al, 2006). In this current study, only cannabis users had enhanced N2pc amplitudes towards fearful faces, suggesting that unlike P1, cannabis users had increased attentional bias which resembles the finding in anxiety disorders (Bar-Haim et al 2007).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 65%
“…Two studies have reported enhanced amygdala responding to neutral expressions in adult SP, emphasizing the importance of contrasting response to emotional and neutral face-event types (3, 8). However, a further four studies (4, 6, 9, 11), like the current study, did not, suggesting that SP is not associated with heightened responsiveness to face stimuli generally. In contrast, hyper-responsiveness to angry expressions has been found with more consistency (4, 6, 7, 9, 13), though see (11).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
(Expert classified)
“…However, a further four studies (4, 6, 9, 11), like the current study, did not, suggesting that SP is not associated with heightened responsiveness to face stimuli generally. In contrast, hyper-responsiveness to angry expressions has been found with more consistency (4, 6, 7, 9, 13), though see (11). Finally, only two previous studies of SP (4, 11) used fearful faces, the stimulus class most consistently shown to engage the amygdala of healthy adolescents and adults (28), and these generated inconsistent findings.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
(Expert classified)
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“…However, the locations of activations that predicted response were not the regions most consistently reported in studies comparing brain responses in patients with SAD and typical control groups, such as the amygdala and other limbic areas. 24,45 In the present study, even when using a specific region of interest, no association with treatment response was found in the amygdala despite its robust activation to all experimental conditions. This may be consistent with a prior study reporting no abnormality in the amygdala response to angry faces in SAD.…”
Section: Cognitive Neuroscience Of Treatment Response Prediction In Sadcontrasting
(Expert classified)
“…Chronic immobilization stress was previously found to induce dendritic hypertrophy in excitatory neurons in the BLA in rats [81] and atrophy in amygdaloid interneurons accompanied by significantly reduced levels of GAD67 mRNA and protein in mice [82]. Although more studies are needed to verify this view, a bias towards amygdala excitation in the excitation/inhibition balance would be in agreement with evidence in clinical populations that typically display alterations in emotionality and social behaviors, such as autism and anxiety disorders patients [83][85]. Interestingly, mice deficient in GAD65 show increased anxiety-like behaviors [86].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 57%
“…Owing to strong longitudinal and family-based aggregation among MDD and anxiety disorders manifest in adolescents and adults,310,14 one might expect brain imaging findings in adult MDD and anxiety1621,24 to parallel the findings observed in this study in adolescents. Nevertheless, few imaging studies contrast anxious and depressed adults with any paradigm; none use paradigms similar to the one used herein, which shows that different conclusions emerge concerning between-group comparisons as a function of relatively subtle task-related features.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 67%
“…Existing data support competing hypotheses. On the one hand, data in adults,1621,24 together with the strong cross-sectional, longitudinal, and familial relationships among adolescent and adult anxiety and MDD,310,14 raise the expectation of overlapping amygdala perturbations, consistent with a “shared diathesis” perspective 11,12. On the basis of these data, one might expect similarly biased amygdala engagement in anxious and depressed adolescents relative to healthy peers.…”
mentioning
confidence: 93%
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“…As expected, SAD patients recorded an excessive activation of the amygdala in emotional paradigms and reduced functional coupling of the left amygdala (Hahn et al, 2011). Similarly, patients with SAD have consistently exhibited greater amygdala activation in response to potential social stimuli, negative emotions (Etkin and Wager, 2007), and harsh facial perception (Birbaumer et al, 1998;Phan et al, 2006). A decrease in beta connectivity was also observed between the left and right anterior cingulate cortex (Imperatori et al, 2019).…”
Section: Functional Connectivitysupporting
confidence: 66%
“…FC estimation is mostly dependent on the use of the resting-state fMRI data of different brain sites. The level of FC is usually quantified between all neural activity units in the brain, irrespective of Luck, 2012Peelen et al, 2007Kolassa et al, 2009Kolassa et al, 2007Torrence et al, 2019Hagemann et al, 2016de Bruijn et al, 2020Meynadasy et al, 2019Fang et al, 2019 Peschard et al, 2013Luck, 2012Normann et al, 2007Kolassa et al, 2009Hagemann et al, 2016MacNamara et al, 2019 Xing et al, 2017Yuan et al, 2016Bhaumik et al, 2017Imperatori et al, 2019Prater et al, 2013Qiu et al, 2011Hahn et al, 2011Etkin and Wager, 2007Phan et al, 2006Kawaguchi et al, 2016Klumpp et al, 2012 GSAD patients display high decreased connection in the amygdala compared with baseline after application of CBT. Unanimity links used to differentiate SAD subjects are broadly located within or through the DMN Lower beta FC is shown in the right and the right amygdala and anterior cortex HSA displayed decreased FC between the amygdala and cortex compared to HC while watching fearful faces.…”
Section: Functional Connectivitymentioning
confidence: 99%