2014
DOI: 10.3390/toxins6051526
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Venomous snakebites are an important health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake found in South and Southeast Asia. In this study, the O. hannah venom proteome and the venom components cross-reactive to N. kaouthia monospecific antivenin were studied. O. hannah venom consisted of 14 different protein families, including three finger toxins, phospholipases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, cobra venom factor, muscarinic toxin, L-amino acid… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2
1

Citation Types

3
32
0

Year Published

2015
2015
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
9

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 21 publications
(35 citation statements)
references
References 50 publications
3
32
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The study verified the presence of some previously isolated toxins but shed little light on the venom proteome. Another recent report on king cobra(s) venom of probable Thai origin profiled the venom as well, detecting 14 protein types/families (including hypothetical proteins), but again without the estimation of relative toxin abundance [ 25 ]. The 1D electrophoretic gel findings of the Thai king cobra venom appeared similar to that reported by Chang et al [ 19 ], suggesting that 3FTxs are the major component of king cobra venoms of different localities.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The study verified the presence of some previously isolated toxins but shed little light on the venom proteome. Another recent report on king cobra(s) venom of probable Thai origin profiled the venom as well, detecting 14 protein types/families (including hypothetical proteins), but again without the estimation of relative toxin abundance [ 25 ]. The 1D electrophoretic gel findings of the Thai king cobra venom appeared similar to that reported by Chang et al [ 19 ], suggesting that 3FTxs are the major component of king cobra venoms of different localities.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Endonucleases have been reported in the venom of some snakes [74], Physalia physalis (Cnidaria: Siphonophora) [75], Chrysaora quinquecirrha (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) [76], and Nasonia vitripennis [46]. …”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…He described the experience as "feeling trapped and totally helpless". (Danpaiboon et al 2014). It consists of at least 14 different protein families, including three finger toxins, phospholipases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, cobra venom factor, muscarinic toxin, L-amino acid oxidase, hypothetical proteins, low cysteine protein, phosphodiesterase, proteases, vespryn toxin, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors, growth factor activators and others (coagulation factor, endonuclease, 5'-nucleotidase) (Danpaiboon et al 2014;Li et al 1994).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(Danpaiboon et al 2014). It consists of at least 14 different protein families, including three finger toxins, phospholipases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, cobra venom factor, muscarinic toxin, L-amino acid oxidase, hypothetical proteins, low cysteine protein, phosphodiesterase, proteases, vespryn toxin, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors, growth factor activators and others (coagulation factor, endonuclease, 5'-nucleotidase) (Danpaiboon et al 2014;Li et al 1994). A functional proteomics study of O. hannah venom sampled from five distinct geographic regions revealed fast evolution and dynamic translational regulation of the venom composition (Chang et al 2013).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%