2017
DOI: 10.3390/toxins9040135
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Protein Discovery: Combined Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Venom from the Endoparasitoid Cotesia chilonis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

Abstract: Many species of endoparasitoid wasps provide biological control services in agroecosystems. Although there is a great deal of information on the ecology and physiology of host/parasitoid interactions, relatively little is known about the protein composition of venom and how specific venom proteins influence physiological systems within host insects. This is a crucial gap in our knowledge because venom proteins act in modulating host physiology in ways that favor parasitoid development. Here, we identified 37 p… Show more

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Cited by 35 publications
(62 citation statements)
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“…Both transcriptome and proteome reported the presence of membrane, cytoskeletal or mitochondrial proteins, lacking the predicted signal peptide (e.g., myosin, calcium-transporting ATPase, tubulin). While these genes are expected to be found in the transcriptome of venom glands, their presence in the venom proteome very likely derives from a contamination due to cell breakage during sample collection [26]. Table S3 Venom includes secreted proteins, which are expressed at different levels, and their abundance is often associated with important biological functions [15,60].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Both transcriptome and proteome reported the presence of membrane, cytoskeletal or mitochondrial proteins, lacking the predicted signal peptide (e.g., myosin, calcium-transporting ATPase, tubulin). While these genes are expected to be found in the transcriptome of venom glands, their presence in the venom proteome very likely derives from a contamination due to cell breakage during sample collection [26]. Table S3 Venom includes secreted proteins, which are expressed at different levels, and their abundance is often associated with important biological functions [15,60].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The large number of studies on venom of endoparasitoid wasps has led to the identification and functional characterization of several molecules involved in the host regulation [12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19]. More recently, the advent of highthroughput technologies greatly contributed to this research area through a "multi-omic" approach often denoted as venomics, which is the integration of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics [20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27]. Such an integrated approach provides a remarkable amount of molecular information and paves the way for the identification and exploitation of new biomolecules potentially useful for therapeutic and agricultural applications [28].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…With the increase of recombinant SguaSOD3 concentration in the hemolymph, the PO activity significantly decreases. (Colinet et al, 2011;Liu et al, 2018;Liu, Wang, Zhang, Huang, & Zhu, 2017;Teng et al, 2017). These results suggest that SOD is commonly present in venom of parasitoids.…”
Section: Effect Of Sguasod3 On the Melanization Of Hemolymphmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…SODs have been identified in venoms of several other parasitoids such as L. boulardi , Cotesia chilonis , Tetrastichus brontispae , and Diversinervus elegans (Colinet et al, ; Liu et al, ; Liu, Wang, Zhang, Huang, & Zhu, ; Teng et al, ). These results suggest that SOD is commonly present in venom of parasitoids.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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