2010
DOI: 10.1080/00313830903488460
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Equivalence of Translations in International Reading Literacy Studies

Abstract: Recent years have witnessed a significant increase in the interest in international assessments of student performance. In such assessments it is mandatory that all the different-language texts be equivalent to each other, that is, equally difficult to understand. The article summarizes a study made on the topic, examining the problems of equivalence encountered when translating texts in international reading literacy assessments. In the study, three English and Finnish texts used in the PISA 2000 reading test… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(20 citation statements)
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References 35 publications
(51 reference statements)
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“…Our study has greatest family resemblance with another one that compared the equivalence of translations in international reading literacy studies (Arffman, 2010). That study noted (a) problems related to language-specific differences in grammar (e.g., word length, clause structure, reference and pronoun systems), (b) language-specific differences in writing systems (e.g., semantic use of commas), (c) language-specific differences in meaning (e.g., frequency of use of technical words in vernacular), (d) differences in culture (narratives situated in specific cultural settings, e.g., U.S.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Our study has greatest family resemblance with another one that compared the equivalence of translations in international reading literacy studies (Arffman, 2010). That study noted (a) problems related to language-specific differences in grammar (e.g., word length, clause structure, reference and pronoun systems), (b) language-specific differences in writing systems (e.g., semantic use of commas), (c) language-specific differences in meaning (e.g., frequency of use of technical words in vernacular), (d) differences in culture (narratives situated in specific cultural settings, e.g., U.S.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…That study noted (a) problems related to language-specific differences in grammar (e.g., word length, clause structure, reference and pronoun systems), (b) language-specific differences in writing systems (e.g., semantic use of commas), (c) language-specific differences in meaning (e.g., frequency of use of technical words in vernacular), (d) differences in culture (narratives situated in specific cultural settings, e.g., U.S. Deep South), (e) strategies used and choices made by the translators, and (f) writing errors (e.g., punctuation) (Arffman, 2010). In that study, the author conducted the analyses based on her theoretically informed interpretations of literary texts.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Such texts cannot possibly be called "authentic". Arffman (2010) notes that bad translations may also cause the readers to lose interest and motivation to get engaged with the text, and that this may severely have a negative effect on the tests results. This effect is likely to be higher in countries where students are critical, independent and unwilling to obey the authority of schools and the teachers.…”
Section: Item Translations: An Examplementioning
confidence: 99%
“…(Skolverket, 2007) Language translation procedures in PISA are highly standardized to assure assessment quality (Bybee, McCrae, & Laurie, 2009;Grisay, 2003). However, several studies have pointed at translation-related problems in PISA (Arffman, 2010;Puchhammer, 2007). The two words in bold font, sämre and bättre, stands for worse and better.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%