2015
DOI: 10.1080/01596306.2015.1025039
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PISA truth effects: the construction of low performance

Abstract: Countries with large numbers of students who struggle to master basic reading skills at age 15 are likely to be held back in the future, when those students become adults who lack the skills needed to function effectively in the workplace and in society. Among students who fail to reach the baseline level of performance (Level 2) in mathematics, reading or science, most can be expected not to continue with education beyond compulsory schooling, and therefore risk facing difficulties using mathematics, reading … Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(6 citation statements)
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References 26 publications
(40 reference statements)
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“…one semester, one academic year). Concern about matters such as student grades have not led to a rethink about how we do educational research, but to an increased obsession with standardised testing as objective measures to break the subjectivity of student grades (as critiqued by Serder and Ideland 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…one semester, one academic year). Concern about matters such as student grades have not led to a rethink about how we do educational research, but to an increased obsession with standardised testing as objective measures to break the subjectivity of student grades (as critiqued by Serder and Ideland 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…At the same time the TEF can defend universities against accusations of poor teaching-if the student does not learn as well as they should they only have themselves to blame. However, with reference to international PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) tests Serder and Ideland (2016) observe how poor education is 'constructed' as the tests have become a 'taken for granted' measure in comparing international educational standards. PISA represents a truth about a society's education system which cannot be debated.…”
Section: Broader Lessons For Higher Education Beyond the Tefmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Researchers have questioned the adoption of a single and simplistic measurement of a HPES based on summative, standardised and largely written assessments. For example, Serder and Ideland (2016: 345) contend that achievement in ILSAs only reflects ‘an attribute of the ensemble of test items and students’. Relying on and linking high performance to quantitative measurements, ‘testing becomes synonymous with accountability, which becomes synonymous with education quality’ (Smith, 2016: 7).…”
Section: The Notion Of a High-performing Education Systemmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…'The globalisation of education' has resulted in increased global inequalities (Zajda, 2015;Connell, 2013), notwithstanding, the confusions and challenges of implementing global educational reforms (O'Leary & Wood, 2016). Since the advent of the PISA media 'phenomenon' educators and scholars have begun to see beyond the 'hype', for instance, Biesta (2015) indicates the deeper theoretical and practical consequences from an overt focus on 'numbers ', 'measurements' and 'comparisons' in education. PISA as a discursive construct has been problematised in relation to the ways PISA has had an adverse effect on teaching and learning (Serder & Ideland, 2016), in the ways PISA has shaped hegemonic discourses in terms of what is 'thinkable' and 'doable' in education (Bonal & Tarabini, 2013), and, how PISA has discursively been utilised as a political tool in shaping educational policies and national educational discourses (Vega Gil et al, 2016). Pocock (2014) hints at the problems of generalisations and assumptions in education especially with regard to essentialising peoples and/or groups, as Gamboa and Waltenberg (2015) show, PISA relies on a number of generalisations and assumptions about education systems and peoples alike.…”
Section: Educational Practice and Theorymentioning
confidence: 99%