2017
DOI: 10.1590/0074-02760160415
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Vegetation loss and the 2016 Oropouche fever outbreak in Peru

Abstract: BACKGROUND Oropouche virus causes Oropouche fever, an arboviral disease transmitted mainly by midges of the genus Culicoides and Culex mosquitoes. Clinical presentation of Oropouche fever in humans includes fever, headache, rash, myalgia, and in rare cases spontaneous bleeding and aseptic meningitis. Landscape change has been proposed as a driver of Oropouche fever emergence.OBJECTIVE To investigate the landscape epidemiology of the Oropouche fever outbreak that began in April 2016 in Cusco, Peru.METHODS We us… Show more

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Cited by 20 publications
(24 citation statements)
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References 22 publications
(25 reference statements)
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“…Since its first description in 1961 in Trinidad and Tobago (5), OROV has caused several outbreaks and sporadic infections in the Brazilian Amazon, particularly in the states of Pará, Amapá, Rondônia, Maranhão, Acre, Amazonas, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso, and Tocantins (6)(7)(8)(9), and evidence suggests the circulation of OROV in other Brazilian states (10). Since the late 1980s, additional cases and outbreaks of OROV have been reported in Panama, Peru (11)(12)(13), and, more recently, Ecuador (14). The virus has been isolated from sloths (Bradypus trydactilus) (3) and marmosets (Callithrix sp.)…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Since its first description in 1961 in Trinidad and Tobago (5), OROV has caused several outbreaks and sporadic infections in the Brazilian Amazon, particularly in the states of Pará, Amapá, Rondônia, Maranhão, Acre, Amazonas, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso, and Tocantins (6)(7)(8)(9), and evidence suggests the circulation of OROV in other Brazilian states (10). Since the late 1980s, additional cases and outbreaks of OROV have been reported in Panama, Peru (11)(12)(13), and, more recently, Ecuador (14). The virus has been isolated from sloths (Bradypus trydactilus) (3) and marmosets (Callithrix sp.)…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Age distribution of infected patients (b). Seasonality of infection with OROV and its co-infections (c); the inset shows annual rainfall and average temperature data with its maximum and minimum [31] loss in the study area which could help explain outbreak occurrence [26].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Infections in humans caused by OROV are characterized as an acute febrile illness, usually accompanied by headache, myalgia, arthralgia, anorexia, dizziness, chills, and photophobia [18]. These clinical symptoms are observed in around 60% of patients resembling those of classical arboviral infection and highlighting the importance of laboratory diagnostic test [26]. This non-specific presentation has been also observed in our population where headache, myalgias and arthralgias were among the most common symptoms across DENV, CHIKV, ZIKV and OROV samples, with no differences even in patients with co-infections between these arboviruses [7].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Table 1 shows the reports of exportation of the viruses herein as reported to ProMed Mail (https://www.promedmail.org). Currently, understanding the factors of international arbovirus emergence is paramount for reasons such as vector expansion corresponding to climate change, global trade and travel, and increased urbanization and land-use changes such as deforestation [109]. More than likely, these viruses may not have emigrated from the Americas, meaning that populations outside of the Western Hemisphere likely exhibit widespread susceptibility.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%