2011
DOI: 10.14310/horm.2002.1311
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Abstract: ObjectIve: to investigate the effects of concurrent training (ct) on serum leptin, cortisol and zinc concentrations in physically active adults. DesIGN: ten subjects aged (27.1±4.8 years, bMI 25.49 ± 2.65) were recruited to participate in three sessions: control session (cs), concurrent training 1 (ct1) and concurrent training 2 (ct2) sessions with five days of resting between them. In each session blood samples for leptin, cortisol and zinc determination were collected. ct1 session included indoor cycling cla… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…This is consistent with our previous data showing no change in resting cortisol at moderate altitude (Woods et al 2012b) and others at both 3000 m (Bouissou et al 1988) and 4300 m (Maher et al 1975), although it is in contrast with others that have shown an increase with rapid ascent to higher altitudes at 4760 m (Sutton et al 1977) and 6000 m (Okazaki et al 1984). We found no rise in cortisol with exercise in NN, and while some report a rise in cortisol with exercise at SL (Bouissou et al 1988; Wahl et al 2014), this is not a universal finding (Hough et al 2011; Ros et al 2011). We did find cortisol increased significantly immediately following exercise under all hypoxic conditions.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 49%
“…This is consistent with our previous data showing no change in resting cortisol at moderate altitude (Woods et al 2012b) and others at both 3000 m (Bouissou et al 1988) and 4300 m (Maher et al 1975), although it is in contrast with others that have shown an increase with rapid ascent to higher altitudes at 4760 m (Sutton et al 1977) and 6000 m (Okazaki et al 1984). We found no rise in cortisol with exercise in NN, and while some report a rise in cortisol with exercise at SL (Bouissou et al 1988; Wahl et al 2014), this is not a universal finding (Hough et al 2011; Ros et al 2011). We did find cortisol increased significantly immediately following exercise under all hypoxic conditions.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 49%
“…The indoor cycling class was continuously performed [ 9 , 19 , 27 ] and lasted about 40 minutes, divided as follows: warm-up of 5 minutes with an intensity between 2 and 4 of the OMNI scale of perceived exertion for cycling [ 26 ], continuous training of 30 minutes with an intensity between 5 and 7 (OMNI), and cooldown of 5 minutes with intensity between 0 and 2 (OMNI).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%