2009
DOI: 10.2746/042516409x394436
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Head and neck positions influence significantly the kinematics of the ridden horse. It is important for riders and trainers to be aware of these effects in dressage training.

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
4

Citation Types

1
68
0
2

Year Published

2010
2010
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
5
3

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 72 publications
(71 citation statements)
references
References 13 publications
1
68
0
2
Order By: Relevance
“…A flexed head and neck position induced an increase in range of motion of the thoracic and the lumbar back in the unridden horse, which implies an activated use of the hindlimbs, a better step under the horse's body and a more equally divided weight load between fore-and hindlimbs (Gómez Álvarez et al 2006). However, the effect in the lumbar back could not be reproduced while ridden, whereas the thoracic area could not be investigated due to the saddle (Rhodin et al 2009). An extremely elevated neck, however, caused an increase in extension of the thoracic and lumbar back in the unridden as well as in the ridden horse (Gómez Álvarez et al 2006;Rhodin et al 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 98%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…A flexed head and neck position induced an increase in range of motion of the thoracic and the lumbar back in the unridden horse, which implies an activated use of the hindlimbs, a better step under the horse's body and a more equally divided weight load between fore-and hindlimbs (Gómez Álvarez et al 2006). However, the effect in the lumbar back could not be reproduced while ridden, whereas the thoracic area could not be investigated due to the saddle (Rhodin et al 2009). An extremely elevated neck, however, caused an increase in extension of the thoracic and lumbar back in the unridden as well as in the ridden horse (Gómez Álvarez et al 2006;Rhodin et al 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…However, the effect in the lumbar back could not be reproduced while ridden, whereas the thoracic area could not be investigated due to the saddle (Rhodin et al 2009). An extremely elevated neck, however, caused an increase in extension of the thoracic and lumbar back in the unridden as well as in the ridden horse (Gómez Álvarez et al 2006;Rhodin et al 2009). An extremely elevated neck also affected the functionality of the locomotor apparatus much more than an extremely low neck, as evidenced by an increase in peak vertical forces in the forelimbs, which is a potential risk factor for injury Waldern et al 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In a large scale study conducted on photographs of young, advertised and feral horses, McGreevy, Harman, McLean, and Hawson (2010) showed that the head-neck angle requested by riders is significantly smaller than when the horses move freely, whatever the gait and the horse's "experience" in riding. Gomez-Alvarez et al (2006) study showed that amongst six different head and neck positions, the extremely high posture was likely to be the most uncomfortable, leading to a significant decrease in the intra-vertebral pattern symmetry, an increase of lateral bending of the spine, an increased extension of the cranial part of the thoracolumbar area and a flexion in the caudally located part, which could be a risk of injury (Rhodin et al, 2009). To a lesser extent, these studies raise the question of the impact of hyperflexion ("Rollkur": an extremely flexed posture of the neck in which the nose of the horse touches its chest, Figure 1), which is a source of debate as it does mechanically put pressure on the spine (e.g., von Borstel et al, 2009).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Während Rhodin et al (2009) (Roepstorff et al 2002, Waldern et al 2009). In der vorliegenden Studie sprechen die größte Entlastung der Vordergliedmaße in der tiefen Kopf-Hals-Position im Vergleich zu den übrigen Kopf-Hals-Haltungen und die dabei größte Hyperflexion im Bereich des Fesselgelenks dafür, dass die resultierende Mehrbelastung der Hinterhand offensichtlich mit einer stärkeren Hyperflexion des Fesselgelenks einhergeht.…”
Section: Introductionunclassified