2016
DOI: 10.1093/isr/viw040
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Small States, Great Power? Gaining Influence Through Intrinsic, Derivative, and Collective Power: Table 1

Abstract: asymmetrical relationships from the perspective of the weaker state. 2 This article proposes three forms of power that are available and particularly relevant to small states: particular-intrinsic, derivative, and collective power. All states, small or large, can either try to exploit their internal resources or turn to other states. However, because small states, by definition, lack more traditional forms of power, they must specialize in how they employ their resources and relationships. Small states depend… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(13 citation statements)
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References 86 publications
(31 reference statements)
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“…Panke (2012) specifies some of these institutional structures, such as chairing meetings and setting the agenda, that allow states to influence the outcome of a negotiation. Relatedly, small states often band together in coalitions and then vote in a block; thus, while small states lack bargaining power individually, they are able to have significant power collectively (Long 2017). Coalition building is particularly important in negotiations that rely on majority voting because they have the numerical advantages that they need to successfully advocate for their policy preferences (Panke 2012).…”
Section: Powering Through Negotiations and Ratificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Panke (2012) specifies some of these institutional structures, such as chairing meetings and setting the agenda, that allow states to influence the outcome of a negotiation. Relatedly, small states often band together in coalitions and then vote in a block; thus, while small states lack bargaining power individually, they are able to have significant power collectively (Long 2017). Coalition building is particularly important in negotiations that rely on majority voting because they have the numerical advantages that they need to successfully advocate for their policy preferences (Panke 2012).…”
Section: Powering Through Negotiations and Ratificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For småstater vil deltakelse i organisasjonen balansere den normfokuserte politikken med det som i praksis blir en allianseinnretning som kan sikre konkrete nasjonale interesser på kortere sikt (Long, 2016). En balanse mellom det tilsynelatende idealpolitiske og det realpolitiske er en tilnaerming vi allerede kjenner fra norsk politikk, strategi og doktriner (se f.eks.…”
Section: Strategi For Avskrekking I Cyberdomenetunclassified
“…Although it has not drawn much notice, the potential role of small states is also increasing as a result of growing interdependence. This is reflected in the increase in the literature on international relations, politics and the role of medium and small states (Ingebritsen et al 2006;Long 2017).…”
Section: The Increasing Role Of Small States In International Relationsmentioning
confidence: 99%