2003
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-879x2003001200007
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Eye color as an indicator of social rank in the fish Nile tilapia

Abstract: We investigated the association of eye color with the dominantsubordinate relationship in the fish Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Eye color pattern was also examined in relation to the intensity of attacks. We paired 20 size-matched fish (intruder: 73.69 ± 11.49 g; resident: 75.42 ± 8.83 g) and evaluated eye color and fights. These fish were isolated in individual aquaria for 10 days and then their eye color was measured 5 min before pairing (basal values). Twenty minutes after pairing, eye color and fig… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

2
75
1

Year Published

2005
2005
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
5
1
1

Relationship

1
6

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 82 publications
(78 citation statements)
references
References 8 publications
2
75
1
Order By: Relevance
“…This is important to adequately characterize the social stress since the previous history of social interaction modulates the stress response in the Nile tilapia (12). The social ranks of the focal animals were also confirmed by qualitative inspections of the body (9) and/or eye (22) coloration (the eye and body of dominant Nile tilapia fish are pale while those of subordinates are darker).…”
Section: Stressorsmentioning
confidence: 94%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…This is important to adequately characterize the social stress since the previous history of social interaction modulates the stress response in the Nile tilapia (12). The social ranks of the focal animals were also confirmed by qualitative inspections of the body (9) and/or eye (22) coloration (the eye and body of dominant Nile tilapia fish are pale while those of subordinates are darker).…”
Section: Stressorsmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…However, they differ in that electroshock is restricted to the physical contact, with no cue whereby the fish can anticipate the stressor exposure, while a social stressor includes anticipatory psychological components. The presence of a dominant fish is an intimidating threat that can be permanently perceived by the subordinate fish without necessarily involving biting (16,22).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The behaviour of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758), has been extensively investigated. Studies on this fish behaviour patterns considered several aspects, such as communication (Giaquinto and Volpato, 1997), social stress (Fernandes and Volpato, 1993;Alvarenga and Volpato, 1995;Correa et al, 2003;Volpato et al, 2003;Barreto and Volpato, 2004), social hierarchy (Barki and Volpato, 1998), aggression (Alvarenga and Volpato, 1995;Giaquinto and Volpato, 1997;Correa et al, 2003); reproduction (Gonçalves-de-Freitas and Nishida, 1998), learning (Barki and Volpato, 1998;Moreira and Volpato, 2004), and others. However, most of the studies on the Nile tilapia are related to fish production or fish management due to the importance of this species in tropical systems (Vijayan et al, 1997;Barcellos et al, 1999a,b;Gontijo et al, 2003).…”
Section: Agonistic Behavior While Establishing Territory (Test 2)mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Besides these, the eye color is also used as an indicator of social rank in the Nile tilapia, O. niloticus (Volpato et al, 2003), and in other fish species (Beaching, 1995;O´Connor et al, 1999O´Connor et al, , 2000Sutter and Huntingford, 2002). However, in the Nile tilapia, social and rank signals do not rely exclusively on visual cues.…”
Section: Frontal Attackmentioning
confidence: 99%