2015
DOI: 10.1126/science.aac4716
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Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

Abstract: 52% Yes, a signiicant crisis 3% No, there is no crisis 7% Don't know 38% Yes, a slight crisis 38% Yes, a slight crisis 1,576 RESEARCHERS SURVEYED M ore than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist's experiments, and more than half have failed to reproduce their own experiments. Those are some of the telling figures that emerged from Nature's survey of 1,576 researchers who took a brief online questionnaire on reproducibility in research. The data reveal sometimes-contradictory a… Show more

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Cited by 5,194 publications
(1,966 citation statements)
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References 42 publications
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“…This study also effectively used “brain‐wide” visualizations to display large amounts of connectomic information, namely in the connectograms and worm plots. In addition, we present both novel findings as well as replication of observations from earlier studies, the latter being important in neuroscience, which is a field plagued by many underpowered studies that do not replicate (Nichols et al., 2017; Open Science Collaboration, 2015). …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This study also effectively used “brain‐wide” visualizations to display large amounts of connectomic information, namely in the connectograms and worm plots. In addition, we present both novel findings as well as replication of observations from earlier studies, the latter being important in neuroscience, which is a field plagued by many underpowered studies that do not replicate (Nichols et al., 2017; Open Science Collaboration, 2015). …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is increasing discontent that many areas of psychological science, cognitive neuroscience, and biomedical research (Ioannidis, 2005;Ioannidis et al, 2014) are in a crisis of producing too many false positive non-replicable results (Begley and Ellis, 2012;Aarts et al, 2015). This wastes research funding, erodes credibility and slows down scientific progress.…”
Section: The Replication Crisis and Null Hypothesis Significance Testmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, they are also hard to implement and even harder to reproduce in other contexts. Recently, there has been an increasing focus on reproducibility in psychology (Open Science Collaboration, 2015) and worries about claims that only certain researchers have the right ‘flair’ to replicate studies (Baumeister, 2016). Confederate studies in particular may be susceptible to such effects (Doyen, Klein, Pichon, & Cleeremans, 2012), or participants may be behave differently with confederates (Kuhlen & Brennan, 2013).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%