2018
DOI: 10.1111/bjop.12290
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Why and how to use virtual reality to study human social interaction: The challenges of exploring a new research landscape

Abstract: As virtual reality (VR) technology and systems become more commercially available and accessible, more and more psychologists are starting to integrate VR as part of their methods. This approach offers major advantages in experimental control, reproducibility, and ecological validity, but also has limitations and hidden pitfalls which may distract the novice user. This study aimed to guide the psychologist into the novel world of VR, reviewing available instrumentation and mapping the landscape of possible sys… Show more

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Cited by 479 publications
(322 citation statements)
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References 86 publications
(119 reference statements)
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“…This kind of realism inconsistency is not only restricted to a disparity between appearance and motion, however, but could also reflect disparities for example between static facial features (e.g., artificial eyes on a realistic face; Seyama & Nagayama, 2007) or between face and voice realism levels (Mitchell et al, 2011). This may mean that the 'Mons Olympus' challenge of building a fully interactive virtual human, as posed by Pan and Hamilton (2018), would actually require a virtual character that not only acts but also looks fully human. For example, machines that are able to feel, and humans that are not, are considered eerie at a conceptual level (Gray & Wegner, 2012).…”
Section: Theoretical Advantages Of Virtual Beliefsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…This kind of realism inconsistency is not only restricted to a disparity between appearance and motion, however, but could also reflect disparities for example between static facial features (e.g., artificial eyes on a realistic face; Seyama & Nagayama, 2007) or between face and voice realism levels (Mitchell et al, 2011). This may mean that the 'Mons Olympus' challenge of building a fully interactive virtual human, as posed by Pan and Hamilton (2018), would actually require a virtual character that not only acts but also looks fully human. For example, machines that are able to feel, and humans that are not, are considered eerie at a conceptual level (Gray & Wegner, 2012).…”
Section: Theoretical Advantages Of Virtual Beliefsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, machines that are able to feel, and humans that are not, are considered eerie at a conceptual level (Gray & Wegner, 2012). This may mean that the 'Mons Olympus' challenge of building a fully interactive virtual human, as posed by Pan and Hamilton (2018), would actually require a virtual character that not only acts but also looks fully human.…”
Section: Theoretical Advantages Of Virtual Beliefsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…The target article by Pan and Hamilton (2018, in this issue) considers the challenges and possibilities of virtual reality to study social interactions. The authors appreciate the potential to realize experiments with both ecological and internal validity.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%