2018
DOI: 10.1111/bjop.12307
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Virtually the ultimate research lab

Abstract: Virtual reality (VR) can serve as a viable platform for psychological research. The real world with many uncontrolled variables can be masked to immerse participants in complex interactive environments that are under full experimental control. However, as any other laboratory setting, these simulations are not perceived equally to reality and they also afford different behaviour. We need a better understanding of these differences, which are often related to parameters of the technical setup, to support valid … Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Critically, observing scenes in VR typically creates a sense of presence or being there in the scenario (Skarbez, Frederick Brooks, & Whitton, 2017), which is not the case when looking at depictions on a computer screen. Nonetheless, there is still only relatively scarce empirical evidence that social scenarios observed in VR really do elicit more natural modes of information processing (Kulik, 2018). Zimmer, Buttlar, Halbeisen, Walther, and Domes (2019) found comparable self-report, autonomic and endocrine stress markers in response to a standardized social stress test carried out by real or virtual conspecifics.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Critically, observing scenes in VR typically creates a sense of presence or being there in the scenario (Skarbez, Frederick Brooks, & Whitton, 2017), which is not the case when looking at depictions on a computer screen. Nonetheless, there is still only relatively scarce empirical evidence that social scenarios observed in VR really do elicit more natural modes of information processing (Kulik, 2018). Zimmer, Buttlar, Halbeisen, Walther, and Domes (2019) found comparable self-report, autonomic and endocrine stress markers in response to a standardized social stress test carried out by real or virtual conspecifics.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The question of what level of realism is appropriate for a particular research project is one that must still be tested empirically (Kulik, 2018) and defining these parameters is in itself an interesting research question which can be subject to psychophysical approaches (de Gelder et al ., 2018). In particular, it may be interesting to consider the role of both top‐down expectations (based on prior knowledge) and bottom‐up visual inputs in building our experience of a VR scenario.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Second, several commentaries raise the issue of the technical challenges involved in creating psychological experiments in virtual reality, in terms of realism (de la Rosa & Breidt, 2018;Kulik, 2018) and multimodal signal integration (Aglioti & Monti, 2018;de Gelder, Katsyri, & de Borst, 2018). The question of what level of realism is appropriate for a particular research project is one that must still be tested empirically (Kulik, 2018) and defining these parameters is in itself an interesting research question which can be subject to psychophysical approaches (de Gelder et al, 2018). In particular, it may be interesting to consider the role of both top-down expectations (based on prior knowledge) and bottom-up visual inputs in building our experience of a VR scenario.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
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