2008
DOI: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2008.05.021
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Epidemiology of scorpionism: A global appraisal

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Cited by 556 publications
(494 citation statements)
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“…1,2 In Brazil, during the year 2013, health officials recorded 158,002 cases of poisoning by venomous animals; of these, the majority (123,128 cases) was caused by snakes, scorpions, and spiders. 3 Poisoning by venomous animals and their consequences constitute a public health problem and, in particular, a paediatric concern in many countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…1,2 In Brazil, during the year 2013, health officials recorded 158,002 cases of poisoning by venomous animals; of these, the majority (123,128 cases) was caused by snakes, scorpions, and spiders. 3 Poisoning by venomous animals and their consequences constitute a public health problem and, in particular, a paediatric concern in many countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…3 Poisoning by venomous animals and their consequences constitute a public health problem and, in particular, a paediatric concern in many countries. 1 The World Health Organization (WHO) in 2009 included snakebite on its Neglected Tropical Diseases List. 2 It is estimated that 1.841 million cases of poisoning occur every year on the planet, resulting in 94,000 deaths.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Of approximately 1,900 known scorpion species in the world 1 , approximately 30 are recognized as potentially dangerous to humans 2 . In South America, scorpions that are dangerous to humans belong to the Buthidae family, particularly those from the genus Tityus CL Koch, 1836 [2][3][4][5][6][7] .…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…27 Scorpion envenomation is reported throughout the world, mainly in subtropical and tropical regions. 28 The majority of scorpion stings cause mild or no envenomation. Species that cause serious medical problems mainly belong to the Buthidae family.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%