2018
DOI: 10.12809/hkmj176984
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Injuries and envenomation by exotic pets in Hong Kong

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1

Citation Types

0
6
0

Year Published

2020
2020
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
6

Relationship

0
6

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 6 publications
(6 citation statements)
references
References 24 publications
0
6
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Similar to our data, the UK study reported that 69% of the cases were males with a mean age of 32 years of age. A poison center report from Hong Kong also describes several exotic snakebites [18]. A 34-year-old snake breeder in Switzerland was unknowingly envenomed by a black mamba (Dendroaspis polyepis) while feeding a specimen and a medical helicopter was used to transport antivenom to the treating hospital [19].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Similar to our data, the UK study reported that 69% of the cases were males with a mean age of 32 years of age. A poison center report from Hong Kong also describes several exotic snakebites [18]. A 34-year-old snake breeder in Switzerland was unknowingly envenomed by a black mamba (Dendroaspis polyepis) while feeding a specimen and a medical helicopter was used to transport antivenom to the treating hospital [19].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a European Poison Centre study, snakebites accounted for 39% of all bites and stings reported over an 11-year period [4]. Bites by exotic venomous snakes have also been identified as emerging medical challenges in other countries, such as Brazil [16,17], Hong Kong [18] and South Korea [19]. In all these studies, Viperidae or Elapidae were responsible for the most serious cases of envenoming.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Because keepers in Switzerland are required to register their snakes, they usually know the Latin name of their pet [1]. Reptiles are reported to be the most popular exotic pets worldwide [2]. In the United States it is estimated that 1.5 to 2.0 million households own one or more pet reptiles.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Envenomation by exotic pets is an increasing concern in Europe, the USA and Asia, because physicians are often not used to treating patients after an exotic snakebite [3,[6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13]. In addition, the continuing worldwide antivenom shortage poses a further difficulty for specific treatment, since antivenom is the firstline therapy in patients with severe snakebites [2]. In the US Poisons Center Database 258 cases of exotic snake envenomation were reported between 2005 and 2011, involving at least 61 different exotic species [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%