2019
DOI: 10.1029/2018rg000626
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Abstract: Large earthquakes initiate chains of surface processes that last much longer than the brief moments of strong shaking. Most moderate‐ and large‐magnitude earthquakes trigger landslides, ranging from small failures in the soil cover to massive, devastating rock avalanches. Some landslides dam rivers and impound lakes, which can collapse days to centuries later, and flood mountain valleys for hundreds of kilometers downstream. Landslide deposits on slopes can remobilize during heavy rainfall and evolve into debr… Show more

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Cited by 507 publications
(290 citation statements)
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References 814 publications
(1,304 reference statements)
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“…Mobilization of saturated sediments as debris flows is a critical link in the chain of "cascading hazards" that follows in the wake of large earthquakes, fires, and floods (Cannon et al, 2001;Costa, 1984;Fan et al, 2019;Huang & Li, 2014;Jakob & Hungr, 2005). Consequences include economic and infrastructure damage and loss of life.…”
Section: Background and Motivationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Mobilization of saturated sediments as debris flows is a critical link in the chain of "cascading hazards" that follows in the wake of large earthquakes, fires, and floods (Cannon et al, 2001;Costa, 1984;Fan et al, 2019;Huang & Li, 2014;Jakob & Hungr, 2005). Consequences include economic and infrastructure damage and loss of life.…”
Section: Background and Motivationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These earthquakes may reduce the strength of the soil-rocks at the site [27] so that even the latest earthquake (on 29 July 2019) recorded near the site was only 3.3 magnitude in July to August in 2019 and which was 200 km away from the site. The earthquake was also a significant cause of the slide [29][30][31][32].…”
Section: Seismic Fracture Zonementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recent assessments also explicitly try to account for different types of interactions among hazards (Gill & Malamud, 2014;Kappes et al, 2012) . Specific case studies that focus on the interactions among biophysical hazards include: secondary hazards induced by volcanic eruptions (Neri et al, 2008) , earthquakes (Fan et al, 2019) , and concurrent extreme weather events (Forzieri et al, 2016;Vogel et al, n.d.) , sequences of droughts, floods and landslides (Nones & Pescaroli, 2016) , and wildfires triggering floods, landslides, and debris flows (Bendix and Cowell, 2010;Cannon et al, 2008;Moody et al, 2013 ;Staley et al, 2005) . Gill & Malamud (2017) provide a framework for natural hazard interactions, some of which yield extreme outcomes, and a review of documented cases, moving beyond the accounting for 'all-hazards-at-a-place' (Hewitt et al, 1971) .…”
Section: From Multi-hazards To Compound Extremes: Biophysical Framewomentioning
confidence: 99%