1995
DOI: 10.1590/s0034-89101995000100004
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Duration of larval and pupal development stages of Aedes albopictus in natural and artificial containers

Abstract: Aedes albopictus were reared in different containers: a tree hole, a bamboo stump and an auto tire. The total times from egg hatching to adult emergence were of 19.6, 27.3 and 37.5 days, respectively, according to the container. The first, second and third-instar larvae presented growth periods with highly similar durations. The fourth-instar larvae was longer than the others stages. The pupation time was longer than the fourth-instar larvae growth period. The temperature of the breeding sites studied, which w… Show more

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Cited by 22 publications
(18 citation statements)
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“…This process could cause some viable eggs to never hatch under laboratory conditions. Moreover, a thorough analysis may be required in the egg excision, followed or not by the use of a larval whitening technique (Forattini, 1962;Charles, 1967;Swartz and Hebert, 1987;Gomes et al, 1995;Chung, 1997). Another way found for taxonomists to perform the identification of mosquito eggs is the use of existing morphological structures in the eggs, which have the potential to assist in the taxonomic identification of some species of medical interest.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This process could cause some viable eggs to never hatch under laboratory conditions. Moreover, a thorough analysis may be required in the egg excision, followed or not by the use of a larval whitening technique (Forattini, 1962;Charles, 1967;Swartz and Hebert, 1987;Gomes et al, 1995;Chung, 1997). Another way found for taxonomists to perform the identification of mosquito eggs is the use of existing morphological structures in the eggs, which have the potential to assist in the taxonomic identification of some species of medical interest.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, this process requires ideal water and temperature conditions and/or waiting for the larvae to reach an ideal stage for identification, which is time consuming (Cary, 1996). While the maintenance of the environmental conditions could be regulated, some eggs can exhibit a natural delay in their cycle, or even never hatch, making it necessary to use auxiliary techniques for larval release (Forattini, 1962;Charles, 1967;Swartz and Hebert, 1987;Gomes et al, 1995;Chung, 1997). Another possible approach would be the analysis of the morphological characteristics of the egg exochorion, which requires an expert in egg morphological analysis, and expensive equipment (Reinert, 1972).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Duration of all immature stages reared at 25/18ºC significantly differed from those reared at 27/20ºC. Fourth instar and pupa stage were the longest period among the immature post-hatch stages as seen in the field (Gomes et al 1995) and in laboratory, under constant temperatures (Calado & Silva 2002). Joshi (1996) showed that the immature mean period for the males were shorter than for the females, not only under constant temperatures but also under cyclic temperatures, as observed for immature forms under 25/18ºC and 27/20ºC (Fig.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…albopictus has been evaluated under different temperature regimes. While, Gomes et al(1995) found no effect of cyclic temperature (18°C to 22°C) on Ae. albopictus development from the periurban area of Tremembé, São Paulo State, Brazil, Löwenberg Neto & Navarro (2004) suggest that the lower temperature of a cyclic regime (18/25°C) is a limiting factor in mosquito development in a strain from Registro, Sao Paulo State.…”
mentioning
confidence: 79%