2015
DOI: 10.1590/0101-60830000000051
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Abstract: Background: Psychiatrists' views on the mind-brain relationship (MBR) have marked clinical and research implications, but there is a lack of studies on this topic. Objectives: To evaluate psychiatrists' opinions on the MBR, and whether they are amenable to change or not. Methods: We conducted a survey of psychiatrists' views on the MBR just before and after a debate on the MBR at the Brazilian Congress of Psychiatry in 2014. Results: Initially, from more than 600 participants, 53% endorsed the view that "the m… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 15 publications
(17 reference statements)
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“…First, many scientists and philosophers cited in the present paper defend a nonphysicalist position on the MBP. Second, surveys of European university students and health professionals62 and of Brazilian psychiatrists63 found high levels (ranging from 40 to 67%) of rejection of physicalist perspectives on the MBP. Third, a recent international survey among professional philosophers (mainly from Europe and North America) revealed that only 34.6% fully accepted a physicalist view of mind 64.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…First, many scientists and philosophers cited in the present paper defend a nonphysicalist position on the MBP. Second, surveys of European university students and health professionals62 and of Brazilian psychiatrists63 found high levels (ranging from 40 to 67%) of rejection of physicalist perspectives on the MBP. Third, a recent international survey among professional philosophers (mainly from Europe and North America) revealed that only 34.6% fully accepted a physicalist view of mind 64.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Of course, Kendler’s particular view is not necessarily representative of the views of all psychiatrists. It is conceivable that there are psychiatrists who are either philosophically inclined towards dualism or who have no strong commitments regarding the metaphysics of the mind–body problem (Moreira-Almeida and Araujo 2015). However, Kendler’s antipathy to dualism is certainly not an uncommon attitude in the research culture of biological psychiatry.…”
Section: Critique Of Dualism In the Psychiatric Literaturementioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the context of clinical psychiatric practice, Ventriglio and Bhugra suggest that “abandonment of this faux dualism is the first step in the training of physicians, including psychiatrists” (Ventriglio and Bhugra 2015, p. 370). Interestingly, a survey of over six-hundred psychiatrists by Moreira-Almeida and Araujo (2015) found that over half of the participants initially assumed physicalism regarding the mind, but also found that a significant number altered or refined their views after attaining greater conceptual clarity through attending a philosophical debate on the mind–body problem. And so, Kendler’s particular view may not be shared by all psychiatrists, but his attitude towards dualism’s relation to biological psychiatry does at least reflect a common attitude in prominent parts of biological psychiatry.…”
Section: Critique Of Dualism In the Psychiatric Literaturementioning
confidence: 99%
“…His output is massive and, in recent years, has been published mainly in English-language journals. Thus, the group has a consistent line of research and has produced a significant number of productions (see Araújo, 2012, 2014; Araújo, Caropreso, Simanke, & Castañon, 2013; Moreira-Almeida & Araújo, 2015; Sech Junior, Araujo, & Moreira-Almeida, 2013). In addition to his international publications, Araújo has published work in Portuguese (e.g., Araújo, 2010).…”
Section: Historiography Of Psychology In Brazil: From the Beginnings ...mentioning
confidence: 99%