2012
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-35982012000300026
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Abstract: -The objective of this study was to estimate the values of apparent metabolizable energy and apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance and determine the chemical composition of the following feedstuffs: babassu meal, sunflower meal, corn gluten meal, babassu starch flour, meat and bones meal, beans, millet, cookies residue, pasta residue and bread-making residue. The traditional method of excreta collection was used with broilers in the period of 14 to 24 days of age, which were distributed … Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…In the accumulated periods of 1 to 21 days, 1 to 35 days, and 1 to 42 days, the highest gross margins were observed, respectively, at the waste inclusion levels of 296.4, (3494 kcal kg −1 ) presented in the table of Rostagno et al (2017). However, the AMC GE of 0.8152 in the present experiment is lower than that calculated (0.9052) from the data given in the table by those authors and cited in the report of Silva et al (2012a). This contrasts with the lower MM and CF values (8.1 × 10.0 and 13.0 × 18.8 g kg −1 ) and higher NNE and DM values (743.6 × 729 and 888.7 × 885 g kg −1 ) in the present evaluated waste when compared with tabulated values.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 80%
“…In the accumulated periods of 1 to 21 days, 1 to 35 days, and 1 to 42 days, the highest gross margins were observed, respectively, at the waste inclusion levels of 296.4, (3494 kcal kg −1 ) presented in the table of Rostagno et al (2017). However, the AMC GE of 0.8152 in the present experiment is lower than that calculated (0.9052) from the data given in the table by those authors and cited in the report of Silva et al (2012a). This contrasts with the lower MM and CF values (8.1 × 10.0 and 13.0 × 18.8 g kg −1 ) and higher NNE and DM values (743.6 × 729 and 888.7 × 885 g kg −1 ) in the present evaluated waste when compared with tabulated values.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 80%
“…The AMEn and CAMEn values of BWM found in the present study were close to the 3352 kcal kg -1 and 85.37% observed by Rostagno et al (2011). However, they were lower than the 3494 kcal.kg -1 and 89% reported by Silva et al (2012). Nunes et al (2001), in turn, observed 4339 kcal.kg -1 AMEn and 97.90% CAMEn in biscuit waste used in broiler diets.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 58%
“…Means and standard deviation for feed intake (FI), weight gain (WG), and feed conversion (FC) of quail fed diets with inclusion of pasta waste meal (PWM) levels. as-is basis) associated with its high energy value (3543 kcal AMEn/kg), according to Silva et al 2012a, provided a reduction in the lipid levels of the diets containing PWM (Table III). This is explained by the fact that the gradual increase in PWM led to a decrease in the dietary inclusion of corn, soybean oil, and soybean meal, whose ether extract contents were higher than those of PWM, which might have contributed to a decrease in adipose tissue deposition.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The composition of pasta waste as is includes 88.47% dry matter, 3543 kcal/kg nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn), 12.66% crude protein, 0.09% ether extract, 0.08% calcium, and 0.27% phosphorus (Silva et al 2012a). In terms of amino acids, the ingredient contains 0.21% lysine, 0.17% methionine, 0.44% methionine + cystine, 0.25% threonine, 0.43% arginine, 0.41% valine, 0.37% isoleucine, 0.76% leucine, and 0.23% histidine (Silva et al 2012b) for chickens.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%