2004
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.140.7.819
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UV Radiation, Latitude, and Melanoma in US Hispanics and Blacks

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Cited by 107 publications
(71 citation statements)
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References 28 publications
(23 reference statements)
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“…Melanomas in dark-skinned people show a propensity to develop on non-sun-exposed sites, such as palmar, plantar, and subungual sites, but the actual role sunlight has to play in their natural history is unclear (3). There is some ecological evidence to suggest that within black men in the United States there is a latitude gradient of melanoma incidence as there is for whites (25), but this finding has not been universal (26,27).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Melanomas in dark-skinned people show a propensity to develop on non-sun-exposed sites, such as palmar, plantar, and subungual sites, but the actual role sunlight has to play in their natural history is unclear (3). There is some ecological evidence to suggest that within black men in the United States there is a latitude gradient of melanoma incidence as there is for whites (25), but this finding has not been universal (26,27).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[14][15][16] The objective of this study was to estimate the association between the UVR and melanoma incidence in US blacks, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans by means of a large, geographically diverse system of cancer registries supported by the National Cancer Institute.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, the risk of CM, as a result of sun exposure in people with hyperpigmented skin, is not clear. One analysis revealed a higher incidence of melanoma in Black Americans at lower latitudes of residence and higher mean annual UV Index in the United States, although this correlation was only significant for men (29). However, another survey of 11 cancer registries in the United States found that a higher mean UV Index was associated with an increase in melanoma incidence in Whites with some evidence for a latitude gradient in incidence.…”
Section: Sun Exposure and Naevimentioning
confidence: 99%