1993
DOI: 10.2307/3562922
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The Sorcerer's Broom: Medicine's Rampant Technology

Abstract: Like the broom in “The Sorcerer's Apprentice,” technologies take on a life of their own. To bring them under control, doctors must learn to tolerate ambiguity, resist the lure of the immediate, cease fearing uncertainty, and rechannel their response to wonder.

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Cited by 69 publications
(52 citation statements)
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“…Changes in Medicare policy--whether through payment incentives or disincentives or direct requirements or prohibitions--have been demonstrated to a¡ect such behaviors at the margin but rarely ever change them in more fundamental ways. ( p. 53 ) The other factors in uencing behavior include the technological imperative that infuses the entire enterprise of modern medicine with a powerful bias in favor of maximizing the aggressive use of advanced technological interventions whenever possible ( Cassell, 1993;Cranford, 1996 ); an educational and socialization process that instills new health care professionals with an ethos that death is the ultimate failure, to be avoided as long as possible by any means available ( Meier & Morrison, 1999 ); multimedia coverage that actively feeds public expectations of both medical miracles on the imminent verge of discovery and fears of medical sadists running amok in icting unwanted and inappropriate overtreatment at the end of life ; anxieties about adverse legal repercussions, both for overtreatment ( e.g., providing too much pain relief ) and undertreatment ( Kapp, 1997;Kapp, 1998b, pp. 65-96 ;Zuckerman, 1999 ); ageist prejudices and stereotypes ; and even the patient's geographical location ( Anders, 1997 ).…”
Section: Factors In Uencing Behaviormentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Changes in Medicare policy--whether through payment incentives or disincentives or direct requirements or prohibitions--have been demonstrated to a¡ect such behaviors at the margin but rarely ever change them in more fundamental ways. ( p. 53 ) The other factors in uencing behavior include the technological imperative that infuses the entire enterprise of modern medicine with a powerful bias in favor of maximizing the aggressive use of advanced technological interventions whenever possible ( Cassell, 1993;Cranford, 1996 ); an educational and socialization process that instills new health care professionals with an ethos that death is the ultimate failure, to be avoided as long as possible by any means available ( Meier & Morrison, 1999 ); multimedia coverage that actively feeds public expectations of both medical miracles on the imminent verge of discovery and fears of medical sadists running amok in icting unwanted and inappropriate overtreatment at the end of life ; anxieties about adverse legal repercussions, both for overtreatment ( e.g., providing too much pain relief ) and undertreatment ( Kapp, 1997;Kapp, 1998b, pp. 65-96 ;Zuckerman, 1999 ); ageist prejudices and stereotypes ; and even the patient's geographical location ( Anders, 1997 ).…”
Section: Factors In Uencing Behaviormentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Teknologi er knyttet til innovasjon, fremskritt og optimisme (Fredriksen, 2006;Haas mfl., 2012;Strand, Saltelli, Giampietro, Rommetveit mfl., 2016;Greenhalgh, 2013). Teknologier gir, som vi har sett, status og prestisje til sykdommer og spesialiteter (Album & Westin, 2008) og virker fascinerende og tiltrekkende på fagfolk (Høymork, 2013;Cassell, 1993;Davidson, 1995). Dersom helsetjenestens og samfunnets prioriteringer av medisinsk teknologi er drevet av ren teknologibegeistring, er dette selvsagt utfordrende.…”
Section: Innledningunclassified
“…The United States is more likely to credit good health and longevity to modern medicine and technology and therefore there is an emphasis on medical intervention to prevent and treat disease and to maintain health (Cassell, 1993). People in the United States pay far more for medical care than any other country in the world (Anderson & Poullier, 1999).…”
Section: Unique Cultural Assumptions and Policies In The United Statesmentioning
confidence: 99%