2004
DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156164.001.0001
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The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine

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Cited by 446 publications
(169 citation statements)
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“…Science explains disease, while physicians treat patients. Cassell (1991) writes: 'the scientific basis of medicine does not recognise nor provide a methodology to deal with such individual variations on the level of patient-doctor interactions ' (p. 20). Doctors' own accounts of illness including their experiences as patients concur with this differentiation: their narratives punctuate the uniqueness of experience that medicine, in general terms, ignores in its classificatory project.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Science explains disease, while physicians treat patients. Cassell (1991) writes: 'the scientific basis of medicine does not recognise nor provide a methodology to deal with such individual variations on the level of patient-doctor interactions ' (p. 20). Doctors' own accounts of illness including their experiences as patients concur with this differentiation: their narratives punctuate the uniqueness of experience that medicine, in general terms, ignores in its classificatory project.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Definitions of suffering and clear articulation of the aspects of suffering targeted by individual measures are essential. The multidimensional and individual nature of suffering should be taken into account when considering its assessment, as should its variance dependent on culture and context (Cassell, 1982;Wein, 2011). Many authors have noted the importance of context, including cultural, historical, and social factors that impact on the meaning an individual gives to an experience (Barton-Burke et al, 2008;Chio et al, 2008;Williams, 2004).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The features of the medical encounter and the illness experience emphasised by medical phenomenologists and proponents of a more ''humane'' medicine suggest the need to reconsider what constitutes the goals of medicine (Cassell, 1982;Toombs, 1995; and flip EBM's hierarchy of evidence on its head. The quantitative measures and generalisations that come out of controlled trials and biostatistical analysis are not conducive to the questions of meaning that medical phenomenology wants to address and make central to medicine.…”
Section: Phenomenological Implications For Evidence-based Medicinementioning
confidence: 99%