2006
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.11.031
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On evidence and evidence-based medicine: Lessons from the philosophy of science

Abstract: The evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement is touted as a new paradigm in medical education and practice, a description that carries with it an enthusiasm for science that has not been seen since logical positivism flourished (circa 1920-1950). At the same time, the term ''evidence-based medicine'' has a ring of obviousness to it, as few physicians, one suspects, would claim that they do not attempt to base their clinical decision-making on available evidence. However, the apparent obviousness of EBM can and … Show more

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Cited by 323 publications
(270 citation statements)
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“…Lessons from the adoption of evidence-based approaches elsewhere suggests expectations for rapid scale-up of RDTs may need to be reined-in. In addition, those aiming for targets for all patients to be tested for malaria and treated in line with results may need to accept that while the strategy of appealing to 'the evidence' as the bottom line is attractive as a rationalisation project, this may be fought for at the expense of other aspects of the complex social process of health care (Goldenberg, 2006).…”
Section: Enacting Malaria: 'Evidence'mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Lessons from the adoption of evidence-based approaches elsewhere suggests expectations for rapid scale-up of RDTs may need to be reined-in. In addition, those aiming for targets for all patients to be tested for malaria and treated in line with results may need to accept that while the strategy of appealing to 'the evidence' as the bottom line is attractive as a rationalisation project, this may be fought for at the expense of other aspects of the complex social process of health care (Goldenberg, 2006).…”
Section: Enacting Malaria: 'Evidence'mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Unfortunately, many health IT projects are planned as if "implementation" were merely a matter of integrating technology into existing practices, and as if technological devices and systems operated as rational tools or "evidence" machines e containing and reproducing stable "facts" about the world (Goldenberg, 2006). This approach imagines technologies, hospitals, medical workers, and patients to be "pre-givens, thus making the critical task the creation of a 'fit' between technology and organization" (Langstrup, 2008).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the case of my own work on EBM, I found during fieldwork and interviews that the concept of a "hierarchy of evidence" with (meta-reviews of) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) at the top, was not merely challenged by sociologists who criticize the naïve epistemological politics of the EBM movement (Goldenberg 2006). It was also heavily contested within this "movement," or rather, this internally diverse field of practice.…”
Section: Artful Contamination Through Finding Frictions Withinmentioning
confidence: 99%