2001
DOI: 10.1556/acr.2.2001.2.1
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Abstract: Intercultural communication in the global environment frequently involves recourse to translation. This generates new phenomena which, in turn, raise new questions for translation theory and practice. This issue is concerned with the concept of the hybrid text as one of these phenomena. In this introductory chapter, a hybrid text is defined as: „a text that results from a translation process. It shows features that somehow seem ‘out of place'/‘strange'/‘unusual' for the receiving culture, i.e. the target cultu… Show more

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Cited by 34 publications
(18 citation statements)
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“…the target culture" (Schäffner and Adab, 2001). This description seems to be a continuation of G. Toury's views on the translation dominant of the original; however, the authors urge to "differentiate between the true hybrid, which is the result of positive authorial and/or translatorial decisions, and the inadequate text which exhibits features of translationese, resulting from a lack of competence" (Schäffner and Adab, 2001). …”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…the target culture" (Schäffner and Adab, 2001). This description seems to be a continuation of G. Toury's views on the translation dominant of the original; however, the authors urge to "differentiate between the true hybrid, which is the result of positive authorial and/or translatorial decisions, and the inadequate text which exhibits features of translationese, resulting from a lack of competence" (Schäffner and Adab, 2001). …”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The field of translation studies boasts a considerable body of research indicating that translated text consistently differs from native text, to the extent that it is argued by some to be a "hybrid" form that is typical of neither the original nor translated language (Trosborg 1997;Schaffner & Adab 2001). One common finding is that translated texts are simpler and more explicit than native texts with respect to lexicon, discourse structure, and other features (Blum & Levenston 1978;Pápai 2004: 144).…”
Section: Translated Versus Native Textmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…''…policy-making and legislation within the institutions of the European Union aims at a homogeneous discourse, but in the course of the multilingual negotiations (with or without involvement of translation), the specific linguistic and cultural conventions get mixed up and infiltrate each other'' [18]. Such texts have been described by Anthony Pym as resembling ''a horse-necked feathered girl's head on a fish''!…”
Section: Translation Theory and 'Hybrid Texts'mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ideally, provided that he or she was compatible on a professional and personal level with that judge or advocate general, a référendaire would remain working in a cabinet for the full term of his or her employer. Increasingly, however, référendaires tend to remain in that post for a much shorter time than was the norm in the past-nowadays it is common for the staff of a cabinet to change completely 4 See further: Schäffner and Adab [18], p. 169-171. 5 While cabinet may be translated into English as chambers the French term is used throughout this paper for two reasons: first, to avoid confusion with the use of the word Chamber for a subdivision of the Court; secondly, unlike the English word chambers, 'cabinet' in the context of the Court is used to refer both to the judge's or advocate general's suite of rooms and to the staff working there.…”
Section: Référendaires At the Court Of Justicementioning
confidence: 99%
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