2006
DOI: 10.1007/s00122-006-0288-0
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The first gene-based map of Lupinus angustifolius L.-location of domestication genes and conserved synteny with Medicago truncatula

Abstract: We report the first gene-based linkage map of Lupinus angustifolius (narrow-leafed lupin) and its comparison to the partially sequenced genome of Medicago truncatula. The map comprises 382 loci in 20 major linkage groups, two triplets, three pairs and 11 unlinked loci and is 1,846 cM in length. The map was generated from the segregation of 163 RFLP markers, 135 gene-based PCR markers, 75 AFLP and 4 AFLP-derived SCAR markers in a mapping population of 93 recombinant inbred lines, derived from a cross between do… Show more

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Cited by 113 publications
(125 citation statements)
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“…All these cytogenetic chromosome markers together will enable us to construct the karyotype of L. angustifolius. PRINS and C-PRINS will also be useful for the localisation of marker sequences from the genetic maps of the narrow-leafed lupin [22,23] on its chromosomes. That will allow the verification of linkage groups and the integration of the physical and genetic maps of L. angustifolius.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…All these cytogenetic chromosome markers together will enable us to construct the karyotype of L. angustifolius. PRINS and C-PRINS will also be useful for the localisation of marker sequences from the genetic maps of the narrow-leafed lupin [22,23] on its chromosomes. That will allow the verification of linkage groups and the integration of the physical and genetic maps of L. angustifolius.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Part of the resulting RIL population has previously been used to produce linkage maps for L. angustifolius Nelson et al, 2006).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recently, two molecular genetic maps have been produced in L. angustifolius on which le has been mapped Nelson et al, 2006). No marker was located within 5 centiMorgans (cM) of the le gene on the map of Nelson et al (2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Genetic analysis of pod shattering has been carried out in various legumes including soybean [48,[93][94][95][96][97][98][99][100][101], common bean [13,44], pea [18,50,102], cowpea [49,[103][104][105][106], lentil [16,46,107], narrow-leaf lupin [47,108], azuki bean [45,109], and common vetch [43,110]. In most of the legumes that have been studied so far, pod shattering is found to be a dominant trait controlled by one or two genes or QTLs (Table 1).…”
Section: C Shattering In Legumesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Similar to common vetch, a single gene controls the shattering process in azuki bean, Vigna angularis [45,109]. In narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), two genes are involved in controlling the recessive non- shattering trait [108]. One of the two genes, lentus (le) affects the pod endocarp orientation, reducing the mechanical pressure required for pod shattering, while the second gene tardus (ta) causes the dorsal and ventral pod seams to be fused, inhibiting the separation of the two halves [47].…”
Section: C Shattering In Legumesmentioning
confidence: 99%