1999
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-879x1999000500010
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Abstract: Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrowderived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered patte… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…In this regard, we recently proposed that the substrate for such migration corresponds to microenvironmental cell‐derived ECM components, organized in a supramolecular arrangement, within the thymic lobules 40. In theory, sequential adhesion and de‐adhesion of migrating thymocytes would take place in this process 41. We postulate that galectin‐3 would favor the de‐adhesion step.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…In this regard, we recently proposed that the substrate for such migration corresponds to microenvironmental cell‐derived ECM components, organized in a supramolecular arrangement, within the thymic lobules 40. In theory, sequential adhesion and de‐adhesion of migrating thymocytes would take place in this process 41. We postulate that galectin‐3 would favor the de‐adhesion step.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Cell migration is a complex process that sequentially involves adhesion and deadhesion events [5], combined with cellular strategies that surmount the biophysical resistance imposed by three-dimensional microenvironments [6,7]. The formation of adhesion sites stabilizes the newly formed cellular extensions and permits the cell to exert forces against the substrate [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Integrins are receptors for these extracellular matrix components. The b 1 a 5 integrin is one of the fibronectin receptors, and the b 1 a 6 intergrin, for example, has been described as a ligand for laminin 2, which is also known as merosin (Villa-Verde et al 1999;Iwao et al 2000;Yanagawa et al 2001).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%