2017
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2017.02100
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Abstract: The human milk is fundamental for a correct development of newborns, as it is a source not only of vitamins and nutrients, but also of commensal bacteria. The microbiota associated to the human breast milk contributes to create the “initial” intestinal microbiota of infants, having also a pivotal role in modulating and influencing the newborns’ immune system. Indeed, the transient gut microbiota is responsible for the initial change from an intrauterine Th2 prevailing response to a Th1/Th2 balanced one. Bacter… Show more

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Cited by 103 publications
(91 citation statements)
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“…Breast milk also supports the initial intestinal colonization in early life [51]. In the present study, the rat milk microbiota was vastly dominated by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, similarly to human breast milk [33].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 60%
“…Breast milk also supports the initial intestinal colonization in early life [51]. In the present study, the rat milk microbiota was vastly dominated by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, similarly to human breast milk [33].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 60%
“…As we previously reported, C. difficile was associated with lower sIgA concentrations among EBF infants (p = 0.047, Figure 3) (11). Since infant secretion of sIgA has been positively correlated with breastmilk sIgA levels and breastmilk microbiota, maternal factors may contribute to lower concentrations in the infant (35,36). Notably, animal models have shown that offspring nursed by mothers who are sIgA-deficient have a different gut microbiota composition than those receiving sIgA through breastmilk (37,38).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 51%
“…Similar to what we observed in EBF C. difficile positive infants, reduced fecal sIgA was associated with compositional differences that included an increased relative abundance of Lachnospiraceae and pro-inflammatory microbiota. Previous work from the CHILD Cohort Study has shown that sIgA in breastmilk may be depleted due to factors such as depression (21) or an altered maternal milk microbiota (36), which may predispose the infant to colonization by C. difficile and related dysbiosis. Although sIgA can bind enteric pathogens (34), there is a lack of evidence suggesting that C. difficile contributes to the destruction of sIgA or reduce production of this protein.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, breastfed infants showed a longer period of pulmonary health and stability prior to their first pulmonary exacerbation, with 20% of breastfed children having no exacerbation over the first 30 months of life, in contrast to exclusively formula-fed infants, all of whom experienced CF exacerbations by 9 months (8). Given the impact of breastfeeding on intestinal microbiota composition (16)(17)(18), one possible explanation for these findings in CF is an effect of intestinal bacterial communities on airway disease outcomes. Consistent with this idea, a previous analysis of a subset of subjects from our cohort (aged 0 to 34 months) showed that community composition in the intestine, rather than the airway microbiota, was significantly associated with pulmonary exacerbations prior to age 6 months (8).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%