2008
DOI: 10.1590/s0074-02762008000700008
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Reduced protective effect of Plasmodium berghei immunization by concurrent Schistosoma mansoni infection

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Cited by 14 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…Other studies demonstrated that children infected with S. mansoni are more likely to harbor P. falciparum parasites than children who do not have schistosomiasis (27). Our study, along with others (10,13,14,20,24,27), suggests that S. mansoni can decrease host immune responses to malaria parasites and/or the ability to clear infections following antimalarial treatment.…”
Section: Immune Responses During Coinfectionssupporting
confidence: 69%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Other studies demonstrated that children infected with S. mansoni are more likely to harbor P. falciparum parasites than children who do not have schistosomiasis (27). Our study, along with others (10,13,14,20,24,27), suggests that S. mansoni can decrease host immune responses to malaria parasites and/or the ability to clear infections following antimalarial treatment.…”
Section: Immune Responses During Coinfectionssupporting
confidence: 69%
“…A Plasmodium berghei-S. mansoni-coinfected mouse model displayed delayed clearance of parasitemia after malaria chemotherapy (14). Similarly, in a murine immunization model, concomitant infection with P. berghei and S. mansoni demonstrated increased mortality associated with malaria (13). However, these findings are limited, as the malaria species that infect mice do not adequately reflect the biology and pathogenesis of the species, particularly P. falciparum, that cause human malaria infections (8).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although most studies were conducted on animal models, they reported that S. mansoni co-infection contributes to severe malaria presentation. They revealed that S. mansoni co-infection resulted in high Plasmodium parasitemia and increased susceptibility of infected mouse models to mortality [ 11 14 ]. In contrast, others illustrated that S. mansoni co-infection contributed to low Plasmodium parasitemia and inhibited cerebral malaria [ 15 17 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Similar effects of H. polygyrus have been reported for a DNA malaria vaccine, but not for live, irradiated sporozoites, 48 or for live BCG, 49 indicating that the impact of a particular helminth differs by vaccine type: protein, DNA or live attenuated organisms. Mice infected with Schistosoma species (which cause systemic infections) show impaired induction of protective immunity both to malaria 50 and to TB challenge (following BCG), 51 indicating that different helminth infections have different effects. Schistosoma infections also resulted in impaired antibody responses to toxoid and protein vaccines—but a study on hepatitis B immunisation showed a gradual recovery of the response when the infection was treated after immunisation.…”
Section: Worms and Vaccinesmentioning
confidence: 99%