2015
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-015-1468-2
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Prevalence and clinical correlates of Schistosoma mansoni co-infection among malaria infected patients, Northwest Ethiopia

Abstract: BackgroundIn Ethiopia, where malaria and schistosomiasis are co-endemic, co-infections are expected to be high. However, data about the prevalence of malaria-schistosomiasis co-infection and their clinical correlation is lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni co-infection and associated clinical correlates in malaria patients.MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 at Chwahit Health Center, in northwest Ethiopia. Blood film positive malaria patien… Show more

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Cited by 23 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…Studies in older children (5–18 years old) indicate that the presence of multiple infections in endemic areas lead to significant morbidity, including anaemia and malnutrition and these are important in the formative years of PSAC [ 58 ]. Specific coinfection studies include malaria–schistosomiasis, where studies in SAC suggest that malaria severity is compounded by schistosome infection, and malaria treatment is more effective when schistosome infection is also treated [ 62 , 63 ]. To date, no detailed studies have been conducted on the fraction of malaria deaths in PSAC that are attributable to schistosome coinfection.…”
Section: Pathology and Morbiditymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Studies in older children (5–18 years old) indicate that the presence of multiple infections in endemic areas lead to significant morbidity, including anaemia and malnutrition and these are important in the formative years of PSAC [ 58 ]. Specific coinfection studies include malaria–schistosomiasis, where studies in SAC suggest that malaria severity is compounded by schistosome infection, and malaria treatment is more effective when schistosome infection is also treated [ 62 , 63 ]. To date, no detailed studies have been conducted on the fraction of malaria deaths in PSAC that are attributable to schistosome coinfection.…”
Section: Pathology and Morbiditymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We studied the changes of iNOS gene and its activity, which involved in the reaction of L-arginine decomposition into NO and L-citrulline. Endotoxin or cytokines, such as LPS and IFN-γ, can induce chicken macrophages to produce iNOS and further produce nitric oxide [25]. Our research shows that infection with C. psittaci can significantly decrease iNOS expression level and enzyme activity as well as NO concentration of HD11 cells by H9N2 infection.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 66%
“…For example, in 1918, the human influenza virus pandemic, almost all cases of death were caused by bacteria mixed infection, and the study found that the addition of bacteria could greatly increase the risk of death [24]. Common infections of malaria and helminth are common in less developed countries [25]. In pig breeding industry, the mixed infection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2 virus is very serious in large-scale pig farms [26].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, in 1918, in the human influenza virus pandemic, almost all cases of death were caused by bacteria mixed infection, and the additional bacterial infection greatly increased the risk of death [25]. Moreover, the combination of malaria and helminth is prevalent in less-developed countries [26]. Hence, identifying the primary pathogen of the mixed infection has been underestimated due to limited investigation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%