2019
DOI: 10.3390/ani10010051
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Abstract: The objective was to investigate the effect of supplementing Awassi lambs fed low-quality forage with soybean meal. Twenty-one lambs (initial body weight (BW) of 26.1 ± 2.57 kg) were randomly assigned to the study diets, 1) the basal diet (forage mix; CON; n = 7); 2) the basal diet supplemented with either 125 (SBM125; n = 7); or 3) with 250 (SBM250; n = 7) SBM g/head/day. The forage mix was composed of 65% wheat straw and 35% alfalfa hay. The experimental diet was offered to the animals for 54 days. On day 40… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…The differences could be due to different forage contents included in the diet, physiological age and race (Patiño and Van, 2010); also, environmental and management factors could affect the animal response. On the other hand, it could also be attributed to the palatability of the diet, protein content and intake, elevated intake of DM, better digestibility of the diet, and nitrogen use (Obeidat et al, 2020).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The differences could be due to different forage contents included in the diet, physiological age and race (Patiño and Van, 2010); also, environmental and management factors could affect the animal response. On the other hand, it could also be attributed to the palatability of the diet, protein content and intake, elevated intake of DM, better digestibility of the diet, and nitrogen use (Obeidat et al, 2020).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This mixed grass can be classified as a low quality forage. According to Obeidat et al (2019), low quality forages are deficient in crude protein (less than 8% crude protein; CP), low in soluble sugars and starches, and are made up of natural pastures or crop residues. Supplementing the mixed grass with the National Feed Mills (NFM) Ruminant mix (CP 135 g/kg DM, Table I) have shown that the combination is more than capable of meeting the CP needs of these animals.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This is in agreement with Hossain et al (2003), Yagoub & Babiker (2008) and Sayed (2009) who reported that the level of energy significantly influenced daily feed intake of lambs, suggesting that nutrient digestibility increases with increased supplementation. Obeidat et al (2019) concluded thatlambs supplemented with crude protein (CP) will have greater feed intake and growth compared to the non-supplemented lambs grazing low-quality forages.Water intake was highest (p<0.05) among animals supplemented at 3 % (15.3 L) of their body weight (Table II). It is possible that as digestibility increases there is a greater demand for water to conduct metabolic processes.This study illustrated that aaverage daily gain (ADG) was highest (p<0.05) among ewes supplemented at 3 % (0.70 kg) of their body weight.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The productivity of Awassi lambs depends on feed. Whole grains, such as barley (BAR) and corn (CORN), are the main ingredients in lamb diets since the availability of good quality forage in Jordan is limited by the harsh environment [ 4 ]. The nutritive value of BAR and CORN is reflected mainly in energy content; protein is considered of secondary importance [ 5 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%