2010
DOI: 10.1017/s002531540999124x
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Size at morphological sexual maturity, sex-ratio, and the seasonal variation in abundance of the shrimp Artemesia longinaris Bate, 1888 were assessed off Pinheira Beach, Palhoça, Santa Catarina southern Brazil. Shrimp were collected monthly from November 2003 through to October 2004, in two areas that are customarily used by local traditional fishermen (27852 0 -27851 0 S and 48833 0 -48829 0 W). Of the total of 1099 specimens measured, 23.93% were males and 76.07% females. Mean size at first maturity (LM 50 )… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
2

Citation Types

0
27
1
2

Year Published

2014
2014
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 26 publications
(30 citation statements)
references
References 19 publications
0
27
1
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Generally, female size values on maximum CL, mean CL, and CL at maturity were similar to the ones found by Semensato and Di Beneditto (2008) in Farol de São Tomé, a region of same latitude as the study area (22° S). The values were higher than those found by Castilho et al (2007b), Costa et al (2010) and Dumont and D'Incao (2008), in the latitudes of 23° S, 27° S and 32° S, respectively. However, at higher latitudes of South American (Argentina) those values become higher again, according to Castilho et al (2007a) (37° S) and Boschi and Mistakidis (1966) (43° S) (Table 3).…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 67%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…Generally, female size values on maximum CL, mean CL, and CL at maturity were similar to the ones found by Semensato and Di Beneditto (2008) in Farol de São Tomé, a region of same latitude as the study area (22° S). The values were higher than those found by Castilho et al (2007b), Costa et al (2010) and Dumont and D'Incao (2008), in the latitudes of 23° S, 27° S and 32° S, respectively. However, at higher latitudes of South American (Argentina) those values become higher again, according to Castilho et al (2007a) (37° S) and Boschi and Mistakidis (1966) (43° S) (Table 3).…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 67%
“…Boschi (1969a) and Gavio and Boschi (2004), in Mar del Plata (Argentina) and Nascimento (1981) and Ruffino and Castello (1992), in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), also found a predominance of females in A. longinaris populations. This pattern might be due to higher mortality of the male population (Boschi, 1969a;Cha et al, 2002), easier capture of females because of their larger size (Cha et al, 2002;Costa et al, 2010), longer foraging times of females to meet the feeding needs associated with gonadal maturation (Kevrekidis and Thessalou-Legaki, 2006). In addition, Costa et al (2010) suggested a distinct migratory pattern of A. longinaris between sexes during the reproductive cycle, which would be the mating taking place in deep waters with adult female subsequent migration to coastal waters for spawning.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…For gonochoric (separate sexes) species such as M. acanthurus, sex allocation theory predicts equal sex ratios as parents should produce an equal number of male and female offspring because of frequency-dependent selection against the more common sex in the population (Fisher 1930). However, female or male skewed population-wise sex ratios have been reported before in other shrimps (Alon and Stancyk 1982;Bauer and Abdalla 2001;Fransozo et al 2004; Mejía-Ortíz and Alvarez 2010) and major causes for imbalances in sex ratio among marine invertebrates include sex-specific growth and/ or mortality rates (Wenner 1972), sex-dependant migration (Wenner 1972;Costa et al 2010), sex-dependant mating behaviours (Willson and Pianka 1963;Castilho et al 2008), and/or sampling error (Bolaños et al 2012). Sex-dependant migration does not appear to occur in the studied river.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 52%