2004
DOI: 10.1359/jbmr.040916
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Population-Based Study of Age and Sex Differences in Bone Volumetric Density, Size, Geometry, and Structure at Different Skeletal Sites

Abstract: In a population-based, cross-sectional study, we assessed age-and sex-specific changes in bone structure by QCT. Over life, the cross-sectional area of the vertebrae and proximal femur increased by ϳ15% in both sexes, whereas vBMD at these sites decreased by 39 -55% and 34 -46%, respectively, with greater decreases in women than in men.Introduction: The changes in bone structure and density with aging that lead to fragility fractures are still unclear. Materials and Methods: In an age-and sex-stratified popula… Show more

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Cited by 762 publications
(681 citation statements)
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“…This supports the number of animal studies that have demonstrated periosteal expansion with increased mechanical loading (Pederson et al, 1999;LaMothe et al, 2005). Interestingly, we also found lower CSMI in gymnasts, potentially reflective of the lower age of the gymnasts, through the knowledge that bone width through periosteal apposition also increases during young adulthood (Riggs et al, 2004).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 55%
“…This supports the number of animal studies that have demonstrated periosteal expansion with increased mechanical loading (Pederson et al, 1999;LaMothe et al, 2005). Interestingly, we also found lower CSMI in gymnasts, potentially reflective of the lower age of the gymnasts, through the knowledge that bone width through periosteal apposition also increases during young adulthood (Riggs et al, 2004).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 55%
“…However, few studies have explicitly described these differences. Two cross-sectional studies, one [35] in older Icelandic men and women and one [32] in older residents of the Rochester, MN, area, described age-related changes in bone strength. Both studies demonstrated men have a greater cross-sectional area of bone than women, as assessed by quantitative CT [32,35].…”
Section: Search Strategy and Criteriamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Two cross-sectional studies, one [35] in older Icelandic men and women and one [32] in older residents of the Rochester, MN, area, described age-related changes in bone strength. Both studies demonstrated men have a greater cross-sectional area of bone than women, as assessed by quantitative CT [32,35]. They also showed older women have lower levels of volumetric bone density than men, and both genders' bone size increases with age, resulting in bone strength that worsens more in women than in men as age increases.…”
Section: Search Strategy and Criteriamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These studies neglect to consider that trabecular and cortical bones have different physiological characteristics and, therefore, are likely to be affected by different factors [2][3][4][5]. Age-related bone loss is accompanied by an increase in bone diameter, a putative adaptive mechanism that tends to maintain bone strength [6][7][8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%