2013
DOI: 10.1016/j.cattod.2013.01.011
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Poisoning of cobalt catalyst used for Fischer–Tropsch synthesis

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Cited by 35 publications
(25 citation statements)
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“…On basic Pt/KL zeolite catalysts, these short term, low concentration exposures are beneficial to produce Pt ensemble sizes that promote aromatization, while longer term or higher concentration exposures poison the catalyst both by forming Pt-S bonds and producing large crystallites that block pores, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), and favor only dehydrogenation [50][51][52][53]. Other examples are sulfur added to Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have been reported to have either beneficial or negligibly harmful effects, which are important considerations in setting the minimum gas clean-up requirements [27,30,[54][55][56]. S and P are added to Ni catalysts to improve isomerization selectivity in the fats and oils hydrogenation industry, while S and Cu are added to Ni catalysts in steam reforming to minimize coking.…”
Section: Parameter Definitionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On basic Pt/KL zeolite catalysts, these short term, low concentration exposures are beneficial to produce Pt ensemble sizes that promote aromatization, while longer term or higher concentration exposures poison the catalyst both by forming Pt-S bonds and producing large crystallites that block pores, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), and favor only dehydrogenation [50][51][52][53]. Other examples are sulfur added to Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have been reported to have either beneficial or negligibly harmful effects, which are important considerations in setting the minimum gas clean-up requirements [27,30,[54][55][56]. S and P are added to Ni catalysts to improve isomerization selectivity in the fats and oils hydrogenation industry, while S and Cu are added to Ni catalysts in steam reforming to minimize coking.…”
Section: Parameter Definitionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the case of H 2 S, the requirements can be very strict and concentrations as low as 1 ppm or below are required for some of the applications. This is for example the case when the downstream processing involves further conversion of the gas using transition metal catalysts such as cobalt based catalyst used in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis [4]. Similarly, H 2 S concentrations below 1 ppm are required for the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells [5,6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…If the use of the producer gas requires advanced materials such as catalysts or fuel cells, the impurities need to be removed or reduced down to a very low level .For some applications as low concentrations as 60 ppb have been reported to be necessary [4]. In the case that the gas is to be used in the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell technology or in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis utilizing Co based catalyst, the required H2S limits typically are reported to be 1 ppm [5,6]. Achieving such low concentrations is possible by solvent based absorption methods.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%