2014
DOI: 10.2514/1.g000534
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Pilot Adaptation to Different Classes of Haptic Aids in Tracking Tasks

Abstract: Haptic aids have been largely used in manual control tasks to complement the visual information through the sense of touch. To analytically design a haptic aid, adequate knowledge is needed about how pilots adapt their visual response and the biomechanical properties of their arm (i.e., admittance) to a generic haptic aid. In this work, two different haptic aids, a direct haptic aid and an indirect haptic aid, are designed for a target tracking task, with the aim of investigating the pilot response to these ai… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…The haptic feedback concepts presented in this paper have been shown to have a potential to improve pilot awareness of the flight envelope protection system, and should therefore be used in those single-pilot flight decks. Additionally, haptic feedback has been used to support pilots in a path-following task, which could also be used to inform the pilot on the nominal autopilot control action to increase automation awareness (Olivari et al, 2014). When an emergency situation arises, a remote pilot can assist the on-board pilot (Comerford et al, 2013), where haptic feedback can be used to communicate control actions between pilots, for example, by linking the movements of the control devices such that each pilot can feel the control actions of the other, increase situation awareness of both pilots.…”
Section: Single-pilot Operationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The haptic feedback concepts presented in this paper have been shown to have a potential to improve pilot awareness of the flight envelope protection system, and should therefore be used in those single-pilot flight decks. Additionally, haptic feedback has been used to support pilots in a path-following task, which could also be used to inform the pilot on the nominal autopilot control action to increase automation awareness (Olivari et al, 2014). When an emergency situation arises, a remote pilot can assist the on-board pilot (Comerford et al, 2013), where haptic feedback can be used to communicate control actions between pilots, for example, by linking the movements of the control devices such that each pilot can feel the control actions of the other, increase situation awareness of both pilots.…”
Section: Single-pilot Operationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The literature shows different ways of changing the haptic profile: in the automotive field, there is a strong focus on using a forcing function that can be used as both a warning signal [29,30] or as a guidance force [20,21]. Aerospace applications show examples that add a soft stop (a local step in the amount of force required), a hardstop (a change in maximum deflection) [5], forcing functions [31], changes in the stick neutral position [12], and changes in nominal stick stiffness [32,33]. An example of haptic feedback in the current Airbus A320 flight deck is the detent present on the thrust levers: the controls "click" in the important thrust positions (such as maximum thrust, or the take-off/go-around setting) and require a threshold force to move away from this position.…”
Section: A Haptic Feedback Definitionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…If applied, the information provided by the haptic display is directly proportional to a required control command and, in principle, the pilot can "just follow the position." Previous research showed that using such an approach increased tracking performance while reducing the physical effort [31]. If the pilot does not agree, however, (s)he can choose to override the cue and keep the stick position fixed by actively counteracting, using co-contraction of the muscles [36].…”
Section: Change the Position Of The Neutral Pointmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…All four requirements involve one or more objective thresholds chosen by the user, which will depend on the application. Applications relying on precise predictions of future control inputs, e.g., advanced motion cueing [31], will set more stringent requirements than those that rely on an 'average' HC model, e.g., haptic aids for easy-to-control dynamics [32].…”
Section: Model Selection Criterion Tuningmentioning
confidence: 99%