2012
DOI: 10.1590/s0073-47212012000100006
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. New species of Thaumastus from Atlantic Forest of Paraná, Brazil (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Bulimuloidea). Thaumastus straubei sp. nov. is described from Atlantic Forest of state of Paraná, Brazil. The generic attribution came from morphological analysis of the shell, radula, jaw and soft parts showing unique and exclusive features that allow distinction from all others species of genus known so far.KEYWORDS. Shell, jaw, taxonomy, biome, Neotropical. RESUMO.Thaumastus straubei sp. nov. é descr… Show more

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“…Moreover, land snails are present in non-coastal sites throughout the Brazilian territory (Prous 1986; Mello and Coelho 1989; Moreira et al 1991; Magalhães et al 2001; Brentano et al 2006; Rogge 2006; Rosa 2006; Teixeira 2006; Gernet and Birckolz 2011; Agudo-Padrón 2012; Bandeira 2013; Beltramino 2013; Hadler et al 2013). Among the species commonly found are those from the genera Megalobulimus (Miller 1878) and Thaumastus (Martens 1860) (Figure 2), both endemic to South America and characteristic of high humidity environments (Colley 2012; Fontenelle et al 2014; Macario et al 2016a). Therefore, their presence is also a climate indicator, since it is related to rainy seasons or periods of increased humidity (Abbott 1989; Rosa 2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, land snails are present in non-coastal sites throughout the Brazilian territory (Prous 1986; Mello and Coelho 1989; Moreira et al 1991; Magalhães et al 2001; Brentano et al 2006; Rogge 2006; Rosa 2006; Teixeira 2006; Gernet and Birckolz 2011; Agudo-Padrón 2012; Bandeira 2013; Beltramino 2013; Hadler et al 2013). Among the species commonly found are those from the genera Megalobulimus (Miller 1878) and Thaumastus (Martens 1860) (Figure 2), both endemic to South America and characteristic of high humidity environments (Colley 2012; Fontenelle et al 2014; Macario et al 2016a). Therefore, their presence is also a climate indicator, since it is related to rainy seasons or periods of increased humidity (Abbott 1989; Rosa 2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%