2008
DOI: 10.1590/s0073-47212008000400001
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. The occurrence of cell reabsorption in the ovaries of queens in several rates of laying eggs, artificially impeded of laying, and in nurse workers, of Apis mellifera (Linnaeus, 1758), was studied with light (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of structures were described and named by analogy with vertebrates ovarian structures, as corpus luteus, when resulting from the reabsorption of the follicular cells after ovulation, and corpus atresicus when resulting from total follicula… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Within each follicle, the trophocytes (nurse cells) (Figure 3A-4) are attached by intercellular bridges and connected to the oocyte by the trophic stalk (a narrow opening) (Figure 3A-3) which allows the transport of nutrients, RNA, and ribonucleoproteins from the trophocytes to the ovum during maturation (Figure 3A-1) as described in previous studies (Berger & da Cruz-Landim, 2009;Bili nski & Jaglarz, 1999;Cruz-Landim & Patr ıcio, 2010;Snodgrass, 1985;Tanaka et al, 2006). After transferring their cytoplasmic contents to the developing ovum, the trophocytes undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) (Figure 3A-7) as found in earlier studies (Mpakou et al, 2006;Patr ıcio & Cruz-Landim, 2008). Thus, the oocytes in the proximal vitellarium are small, followed by an organized cluster of trophocytes (Figure 3A circle), whereas the oocytes in the distal vitellarium are greater in size, followed by apoptotic/degenerating trophocytes (Figure 3A-7), as described by Snodgrass, 1985.…”
Section: Ovariessupporting
confidence: 67%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Within each follicle, the trophocytes (nurse cells) (Figure 3A-4) are attached by intercellular bridges and connected to the oocyte by the trophic stalk (a narrow opening) (Figure 3A-3) which allows the transport of nutrients, RNA, and ribonucleoproteins from the trophocytes to the ovum during maturation (Figure 3A-1) as described in previous studies (Berger & da Cruz-Landim, 2009;Bili nski & Jaglarz, 1999;Cruz-Landim & Patr ıcio, 2010;Snodgrass, 1985;Tanaka et al, 2006). After transferring their cytoplasmic contents to the developing ovum, the trophocytes undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) (Figure 3A-7) as found in earlier studies (Mpakou et al, 2006;Patr ıcio & Cruz-Landim, 2008). Thus, the oocytes in the proximal vitellarium are small, followed by an organized cluster of trophocytes (Figure 3A circle), whereas the oocytes in the distal vitellarium are greater in size, followed by apoptotic/degenerating trophocytes (Figure 3A-7), as described by Snodgrass, 1985.…”
Section: Ovariessupporting
confidence: 67%
“…The ovaries are composed of ovarioles divided into four regions (i.e. terminal filament, germarium, vitellarium, and ovariole pedicle) based on morphological differentiation (Patr ıcio & Cruz- Landim, 2002Landim, , 2008. The stem cells (terminal filament) differentiate into germinal cells forming rosette-like clusters (germarium); subsequently, each rosette produces a single oocyte and accompanying trophocytes which together comprise a follicle (vitellarium) (Martins et al, 2011;Patr ıcio & Cruz-Landim, 2002Snodgrass, 1985;Tanaka & Hartfelder, 2004), as illustrated in the present study (Figure 2A-C).…”
Section: Ovariesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1A-E). Although not shown in the present work, follicular abortion and the corpus luteum were also observed, which is a normal condition in the ovarian development of this and other species of bees; this morphology is found mainly in queens but can also be observed in egg-laying workers Patrício and Cruz-Landim, 2008;Tanaka et al, 2009).…”
Section: Morphology Of the Worker Ovary Of The Control Groupcontrasting
confidence: 54%
“…In our study, such cellular death patterns were evidenced by propidium iodide staining, both in the terminal filament and in the germinal part of the ovary ( Figure 1D and 1E ) but, according to their large distribution in tissues, may rather result from a pathological problem. Programmed cellular death seems also to be involved in oocyte resorption when environmental conditions are limiting the egg production of the queens [35] . However, the samples examined here were collected in spring during the warm season and consequently should not normally correspond to such environmentally induced oocyte resorption.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%