2010
DOI: 10.1177/0363199010373544
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Living above the Shop: Home, Business, and Family in the English ‘‘Industrial Revolution’’

Abstract: This article explores the living arrangements and familial relations of small business households in northwest English towns between 1760 and 1820. Focusing on evidence from inventories and personal writing, it examines the homes that such households lived and worked in and the ways in which space was ordered and used: indicating that access to particular spaces was determined by status. This study suggests both the continuance of the "household family" into the nineteenth century (rather than its more modern,… Show more

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Cited by 16 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Th ese eff orts referenced a still viable patriarchal model of household. 43 Similarly, Matthew McCormack has 44 Matthew McCormack, Th e Independent Man: Citizenship and Gender Politics in Georgian England (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2005), pp. 12-30.…”
Section: Schochet's Th E Authoritarian Family and Political Attitudesmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 4 more Smart Citations
“…Th ese eff orts referenced a still viable patriarchal model of household. 43 Similarly, Matthew McCormack has 44 Matthew McCormack, Th e Independent Man: Citizenship and Gender Politics in Georgian England (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2005), pp. 12-30.…”
Section: Schochet's Th E Authoritarian Family and Political Attitudesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…41 Th e shared and common culture of the house was suggested in the claims authors and publishers made to inclusivity and completeness: Th e Universal a Necessary and Profi (London, 1703), p. ii. 43 Th e Complete Family-Piece: and, Country Gentleman, and Farmer's, Best Guide , Second Edition (1736;London, 1737) 43 While certain sections were directed at men specifi cally (notably hunting), most were simply directed to the general and genderless reader. Amongst discussions of medicine, clothes, cleaning, cookery, brewing, and gardening in Th e Universal Family-Book , only the sections on pregnancy and labour, and on cosmetics and beauty, specify an 'especial' interest for female readers.…”
Section: T H E S Hmentioning
confidence: 99%
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