2014
DOI: 10.1007/s11357-014-9640-5
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Abstract: Falls in older adults are a major health and societal problem. It is thus imperative to develop highly effective training paradigms to reduce the likelihood of falls. Perturbation training is one such emerging paradigm known to induce shorter term fall reduction in healthy young as well as older adults. Its longer term benefits are not fully understood, however. The purpose of this study was to determine whether and to what degree older adults could retain their fall-resisting skills acquired from a single per… Show more

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Cited by 96 publications
(125 citation statements)
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“…However, it is possible that, for participants in the current study, the task was not sufficiently challenging for participants to show improvement throughout the acquisition period. Alternatively, others have reported acquisition and long-term retention of reactive balance tasks among older adults with few practice trials (Bhatt et al 2012;Pai et al 2014). These authors have speculated that the threat to postural stability and risk of fall-related injury imposed by external postural perturbations drives this rapid learning (Bhatt et al 2012); a similar process could underlie the large improvements in postural control early in the acquisition period in the current study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 60%
“…However, it is possible that, for participants in the current study, the task was not sufficiently challenging for participants to show improvement throughout the acquisition period. Alternatively, others have reported acquisition and long-term retention of reactive balance tasks among older adults with few practice trials (Bhatt et al 2012;Pai et al 2014). These authors have speculated that the threat to postural stability and risk of fall-related injury imposed by external postural perturbations drives this rapid learning (Bhatt et al 2012); a similar process could underlie the large improvements in postural control early in the acquisition period in the current study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 60%
“…Improvement in limb support & stability in the first 3 trials with no further improvement.Pai et al [57] n  = 67, 44♀, 72 ± 5.5y. Community dwelling, healthy.Slip (low friction moveable platform; slid up to 90 cm forward at foot contact).24 slips in 37 gait trials.Retrospective falls data 12mo preceding & 12mo prospective following the session.Reduction in falls 12mo post-session compared to 12mo pre-session (15% compared to 34% incidence).Pai et al [63]3 groups tested +6, +9 & +12mo respectively: +6mo: n  = 24, 13♀ 74.6 ± 5.8y; +9mo: n  = 23, 15♀ 71.8 ± 5.5y; +12mo: n  = 26, 19♀ 72.0 ± 4.7y. All community dwelling, healthy.Slip (low friction moveable platform; slid up to 90 cm forward at foot contact).24 slips in 37 gait trials.Proactive & reactive stability (measured at touchdown of the to-be-perturbed step & the first recovery step respectively).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…During the slip trial, it could slide freely in the anteroposterior (AP) direction for up to 90 cm forward or 58 cm backward. Once a subject’s right (slipping) foot was detected in contact with the right platform by the force plates (AMTI, Newton, MA) installed beneath the platforms, 24 a computer controlled triggering mechanism would release the platform. The left platform was automatically released after the left (recovery) foot landed on it.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%