2017
DOI: 10.1186/s11556-017-0173-7
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A systematic review of gait perturbation paradigms for improving reactive stepping responses and falls risk among healthy older adults

Abstract: BackgroundFalls are a leading cause of injury among older adults and most often occur during walking. While strength and balance training moderately improve falls risk, training reactive recovery responses following sudden perturbations during walking may be more task-specific for falls prevention. The aim of this review was to determine the variety, characteristics and effectiveness of gait perturbation paradigms that have been used for improving reactive recovery responses during walking and reducing falls a… Show more

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Cited by 138 publications
(147 citation statements)
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“…Given the significance of reactive stepping for maintaining stability, it is promising that older adults show improvement in reactive response to various repeated mechanical perturbations (Bierbaum et al 2011;McCrum et al 2017;Pai et al 2010). As well as acute adaptations, short-term (a few weeks) and longterm (up to 12 mo) retention of reactive adaptations acquired during a single slip-perturbation training session have been seen in the same laboratory settings in older adults (Bhatt et al 2006a(Bhatt et al , 2012Pai et al 2014b).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Given the significance of reactive stepping for maintaining stability, it is promising that older adults show improvement in reactive response to various repeated mechanical perturbations (Bierbaum et al 2011;McCrum et al 2017;Pai et al 2010). As well as acute adaptations, short-term (a few weeks) and longterm (up to 12 mo) retention of reactive adaptations acquired during a single slip-perturbation training session have been seen in the same laboratory settings in older adults (Bhatt et al 2006a(Bhatt et al , 2012Pai et al 2014b).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Gait perturbation training addresses the skills required to https://doi.org/10. 1016/j.clinbiomech.2020.104988 Received 12 September 2019; Accepted 3 March 2020 regain balance and avoid falls, such as reactive stepping strategies and counter-movements of the upper body (Grabiner et al, 2012;Lurie et al, 2013;McCrum et al, 2017). Older adults show improvements of these skills after repeated unexpected perturbations during standing or walking tasks that are retained (Bhatt et al, 2012;Dijkstra et al, 2015;Epro et al, 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ageing has repeatedly been shown to be associated with poorer performance in recovering stability following unexpected gait perturbations 1-3 . However, as previously described, potential differences in gait as a result of the walking speed choices in previous studies may have affected these findings 28,29 . The current study confirms and consolidates previously reported age-related differences in reactive gait stability, as age differences were observed despite the use of individual stability-normalised walking speeds.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 70%
“…However, in both previous interlimb studies, only young healthy participants were included, meaning that the extent of motor errors experienced may have been much less than those that might be experienced by older adults under similar perturbation conditions. 4 Walking speed can influence the impact of, and the response to, different perturbations [25][26][27] and if the same speed is used for all participants, this may result in different degrees of task difficulty 28,29 . In this study, we first aimed to determine if agerelated differences in reactive gait stability and its adaptability in response to repeated mechanical gait perturbations are found when the participants' walking speed is normalised to gait stability.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%