2013
DOI: 10.1007/s11556-013-0126-8
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Influence of chronic exercise on serum cortisol levels in older adults

Abstract: The circulating level of cortisol is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis through a neuroendocrine feedback circuit. This circuit can be activated by physiological stimuli such as stress, diseases, and exercise. High levels of serum cortisol hormone normally occur as a byproduct of aging, and can cause several types of damage to the organism and exacerbate immunosenescence. There is a great deal of variability in the cortisol response with regard to type, intensity, volume, and frequency of exe… Show more

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Cited by 32 publications
(22 citation statements)
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“…There is evidence suggesting that physical exercise promotes an increase of cortisol levels in both younger and older people, but throughout the aging process, the adaptation and recovery from stress are less efficient, and this can lead to a higher susceptibility to older age diseases. However, the entity of stress is strongly influenced by both the type and the intensity of physical exercise [11].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is evidence suggesting that physical exercise promotes an increase of cortisol levels in both younger and older people, but throughout the aging process, the adaptation and recovery from stress are less efficient, and this can lead to a higher susceptibility to older age diseases. However, the entity of stress is strongly influenced by both the type and the intensity of physical exercise [11].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Also, AD-induced high cortisol levels exert neurotoxic effects on the hippocampus and promote oxidative stress, leading to depression, neurodegeneration, and cognitive decline (43). On the other hand, one of the protective effects of regular exercise is lowering the serum cortisol level (44). Although these factors were not measured in this study, the observed improvements can be explained by these mechanisms.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…An increase of cortisol activity induced by physical exertion may lead to a reduction in testosterone concentration in blood [32][33][34]. The ratio of serum cortisol (catabolic hormone) to free testosterone (anabolic hormone) is a key indicator of physical exertion and anaboliccatabolic homeostasis [35]. The present study did not reveal any statistically significant correlations between cortisol and testosterone concentrations (r = -0.182) in members of the EG, who underwent a four-week pelvic floor muscle training.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%