2018
DOI: 10.1590/1806-9061-2017-0550 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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N Okur,
H Eleroğlu,
M Türkoğlu

Abstract: The impacts of breeder age (32 and 55 weeks), egg storage time (2-12 days), setter ventilation program (control-test) on incubation and post-hatch performance of broilers were investigated in this study. Young (Y) and old (O) breeders' hatching eggs were incubated in two different setters operated by two different ventilation programs as control (C) and test (T). Incubation took place after a short (S) and long (L) time of storage in this study. According to the trial design, eight treatment groups were as YSC… Show more

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“…In fact, prolonged storage resulted in a higher early and middle mortality than shorter storage, but this effect was more pronounced in older breeders. Okur et al [ 52 ] and Özlü et al [ 53 ] also noted a higher embryonic mortality rate with stored eggs from older breeders (55 vs. 32 weeks and 27 vs. 50 weeks, respectively). Tona et al [ 18 ] attributed the higher reduction of hatchability of prolonged stored eggs of older breeders to the lower quality of the albumen at oviposition compared to younger breeders.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…In fact, prolonged storage resulted in a higher early and middle mortality than shorter storage, but this effect was more pronounced in older breeders. Okur et al [ 52 ] and Özlü et al [ 53 ] also noted a higher embryonic mortality rate with stored eggs from older breeders (55 vs. 32 weeks and 27 vs. 50 weeks, respectively). Tona et al [ 18 ] attributed the higher reduction of hatchability of prolonged stored eggs of older breeders to the lower quality of the albumen at oviposition compared to younger breeders.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…(2003) reported a decrease in relative growth, and Petek and Dikmen (2006) noted an increase of the feed conversion ratio ( FCR ) with an increase of egg storage duration. However, other authors ( Petek et al., 2003 ; Goliomytis et al., 2015 ; Okur et al., 2018 ) reported a lack of egg storage duration effects on posthatch performances. Concerning the effect of breeder age, Ipek and Sözcü (2015) reported a higher body weight at 7 D of age with younger flocks (33 vs. 62 wk) and explained this result by the higher yolk sac absorption and the advanced intestinal development in hatchlings of the young flock.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…When taking the whole storage duration into account (14 days) a linear effect of storage time on hatchability was showed with an estimated reduction of 1.17% per day of egg storage. Okur, Eleroğlu, and Türkoğlu (2018) studied the influence of storage duration (2 and 12 days) on eggs from breeders aged of 32 and 55 weeks. Okur, Eleroğlu, and Türkoğlu (2018) studied the influence of storage duration (2 and 12 days) on eggs from breeders aged of 32 and 55 weeks.…”
Section: Hatchabilitymentioning
“…This decrease in hatchability was mainly due to the increase of the early and the late embryonic mortality rates (Brake et al, 1997;Butler, 1991;Elibol et al, 2002;Walsh et al, 1995). Okur, Eleroğlu, and Türkoğlu (2018) studied the influence of storage duration (2 and 12 days) on eggs from breeders aged of 32 and 55 weeks. Collectively, they noted that the early embryonic mortality and the sum of late embryonic mortality plus pipped unhatched embryos were higher with 12 days of storage (7.88% and 3.21%, respectively) than with 2 days storage (6.26% and 2.14%, respectively).…”
Section: Hatchabilitymentioning