2020
DOI: 10.1016/j.psj.2020.06.010
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Egg storage and breeder age are between the most important factors affecting egg lipids, chicken quality, and posthatch performance. To evaluate these factors, including their interaction, the impact of egg storage duration (5, 12, and 19 D), and breeder age (47 and 67 wk) was investigated in Arbor Acres broiler eggs and chickens. Total yolk fat content, chicken organ development at hatch and at 6 D of age, and posthatch performance (at 7 D and 35 D of age) were determined. Total fat content in fresh yolk was … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2
1

Citation Types

1
4
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
2
1
1

Relationship

2
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 7 publications
(5 citation statements)
references
References 43 publications
(5 reference statements)
1
4
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Regarding the strain, in the current study, body weight and feed intake of fast-growing chickens were higher than slower-growing broiler chickens on same ages, which is in accordance with previous studies [45,66,67,68]. Due to a use of very young broiler breeders, body weight gain and BW at slaughter was relatively low [69,70], which might have resulted in a low prevalence of leg disorders as well (see below).…”
Section: Growth Performancesupporting
confidence: 91%
“…Regarding the strain, in the current study, body weight and feed intake of fast-growing chickens were higher than slower-growing broiler chickens on same ages, which is in accordance with previous studies [45,66,67,68]. Due to a use of very young broiler breeders, body weight gain and BW at slaughter was relatively low [69,70], which might have resulted in a low prevalence of leg disorders as well (see below).…”
Section: Growth Performancesupporting
confidence: 91%
“…Regarding the strain, in the current study, body weight and feed intake of fast-growing chickens were higher than slower-growing broiler chickens on same ages, which is in accordance with previous studies [ 45 , 68 70 ]. Due to a use of very young broiler breeders, body weight gain and BW at slaughter was relatively low [ 71 , 72 ], which might have resulted in a low prevalence of leg disorders as well (see below).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This might be explained by irregular and poor vascular morphology of the epiphyseal growth plate and insufficiently mineralized bones in fast-growing broiler chickens [ 83 , 85 ]. Slower-growing chickens, on the contrary, have more time for bone mineralization, which compensates the lack of mineralization in the early growth phase, that loads less stress on the skeleton [ 72 , 82 , 86 , 87 ], and eventually result in a low incidence of VV. Despite the fact that VV angulation in right legs differed between strains in the current study, the maximal average angulation was 6.04 o and it can be disputed whether or not this degree of angulation can be considered as VV or as a leg disorder.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This also confirms what is shown in broiler literature: egg storage duration longer than 7 d, especially from older breeders, results in modifications to the blastoderm, which has a negative effect on hatchability ( Damaziak et al, 2021 ). Adapted storage conditions related to the age of breeders might be an option to reduce negative effects of prolonged storage on hatching egg quality ( Nasri et al, 2020c ). Table 4 shows the average hatchability per egg storage duration class for the 3 different models.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%