2020
DOI: 10.3390/ani10101719
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Abstract: Egg storage duration and breeder age are probably interacting to influence egg quality, hatchability, and hatchling quality. To evaluate this interaction, the impact of breeder age (31, 42, 66 weeks) and storage duration (2, 5, 12, 19 days) was investigated on broiler breeder eggs (Arbor Acres). Thick albumen diameter and pH increased, and yolk dry matter decreased between 2 and 19 days of storage. With the increase of breeder age from 31 to 66 weeks, albumen height, percentage and dry matter and shell percent… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 69 publications
(99 reference statements)
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“…in line with the above, reported that storage of Rhode Island Red eggs for 9 d had negative influence on the weight of the chicks. As well, Goliomytis et al (2015) observed lower weight in chicks hatched from Ross 308 eggs stored for 4 and 16 d. The present finding however disagrees with the report of no significant effect of egg storage duration on the weight of Cobb ( Tona et al, 2004 ), leghorn ( Senbeta, 2016 ), heterozygous naked neck ( Addo et al, 2018 ), FUNAAB-alpha ( Abioja et al, 2020a ) and broiler breeder ( Nasri et al, 2020 ) chicks at day-old Tona et al (2004) . only compared fresh eggs with those stored for 7 d. The present study, however, examined eggs in storage up to 12 d and the lowered chick weight was observed only in 12-d-stored group.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 96%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…in line with the above, reported that storage of Rhode Island Red eggs for 9 d had negative influence on the weight of the chicks. As well, Goliomytis et al (2015) observed lower weight in chicks hatched from Ross 308 eggs stored for 4 and 16 d. The present finding however disagrees with the report of no significant effect of egg storage duration on the weight of Cobb ( Tona et al, 2004 ), leghorn ( Senbeta, 2016 ), heterozygous naked neck ( Addo et al, 2018 ), FUNAAB-alpha ( Abioja et al, 2020a ) and broiler breeder ( Nasri et al, 2020 ) chicks at day-old Tona et al (2004) . only compared fresh eggs with those stored for 7 d. The present study, however, examined eggs in storage up to 12 d and the lowered chick weight was observed only in 12-d-stored group.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 96%
“…Transylvanian naked neck chicken eggs seem to be highly sensitive to storage extension, in that storage for 3, 6, and 9 d had already caused a reduction of 18.2, 40.4, and 42.5%, respectively. Usually, hatchability in chicken eggs increases slightly to reach a peak between 3 and 5 d after oviposition ( Addo et al, 2018 ; Ayeni et al, 2020 ; Nasri et al, 2020 ; Rahardja et al, 2020 ; Abioja et al, 2021 ). Thereafter, further storage causes steady reduction in egg hatchability.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These findings supported the ideas of Kirunda and McKee [ 21 ], who reported that weakening vitelline membrane and chalazae caused an increase in yolk diameter and a decrease in its height during prolonged storage period. When the yolk diameter gets larger with long storage duration, yolks become fragile and eventually tend to mix up with albumen [ 22 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, it is worth noting that hatchability was generally lower in the study of Salary et al [ 25 ] even though they used lower concentrations of CCN. The hatchability is influenced by the type of applicated nanoparticles, place and time of inoculation [ 24 ], and finally, by the hatching eggs quality [ 43 ]. Although the BW of the embryo was not affected, we observed an increase in liver weight.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%