2016
DOI: 10.1007/s10531-016-1166-y
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Feral swine damage to globally imperiled wetland plant communities in a significant biodiversity hotspot in Florida

Abstract: We studied rooting damage during five-years of feral swine control at Avon Park Air Force Range, a significant botanical biodiversity hotspot in peninsular Florida with many globally imperiled plant species and communities. While control reduced swine abundance, remaining animals consistently rooted the 49 studied sites in both middle-dry season (MDS) and late-dry season (LDS) each year. At each study site, we measured rooting with sub-meter accuracy. Neither total nor proportional area rooted differed in eith… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…People move to Miami from around the globe, acting as accidental (or intentional) dispersal agents. This has been the case since the early days of European colonization when Old World species were introduced with early settlers (Mack et al 2000), as is the case with feral pigs (Sus scrofa), which were introduced to Florida in the 1500s (Engeman et al 2016). The high volume of imported flora and fauna to global shipping ports in South Florida, such as the Port of Miami, creates more opportunities for non-native species to enter the local environment, and the increased accessibility of new source pools due to global trade expansion increases the total number of imported species (Seebens et al 2018).…”
Section: Propagule Pressurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…People move to Miami from around the globe, acting as accidental (or intentional) dispersal agents. This has been the case since the early days of European colonization when Old World species were introduced with early settlers (Mack et al 2000), as is the case with feral pigs (Sus scrofa), which were introduced to Florida in the 1500s (Engeman et al 2016). The high volume of imported flora and fauna to global shipping ports in South Florida, such as the Port of Miami, creates more opportunities for non-native species to enter the local environment, and the increased accessibility of new source pools due to global trade expansion increases the total number of imported species (Seebens et al 2018).…”
Section: Propagule Pressurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Over time, these alterations to spatial distribution, regeneration, and recruitment of species can influence the canopy of a forest, as it can effectively halt the establishment of new young trees [63]. Additionally, the impacts of foraging by wild pigs can result in the local extinction of plant species [7,61,[64][65][66][67]. Local extinctions permanently alter the composition of the plant community, which can have significant and cascading impacts on the health and function of the ecosystem [7,68].…”
Section: Impacts Of Wild Pigs: Vegetationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As discussed earlier, wild pigs are extremely opportunistic omnivores that will exploit high-value resources. As a result, pig-rooting, as a foraging technique, often leads to significant alterations to spatial distribution, reductions in plant cover, reproduction, and growth, and can contribute to local extinction; all of these impacts reduce competition for resources and increase the available space for invasive plants to become established in [7,61,64,66,69,77]. Similarly, the impacts of wild pigs on vegetative regeneration may also facilitate the establishment of invasive plant species by reducing competition and opening canopy cover in extreme cases [63,69].…”
Section: Impacts Of Wild Pigs: Vegetationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An economic perspective examining swine damage costs of steephead ravines provides useful information for documenting the need and validating the application of fiscal and human resources for protecting EAFB's natural treasures. Economically assessing damage requires placing a value on damage, which has been carried out for a variety of wetlands in Florida using expenditure data from Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) permitted mitigation projects (Engeman et al 2004(Engeman et al , 2016bKing 1998). These data provide an empirical, defensible, logical valuation for damaged wetland habitats, including previously at EAFB for feral swine damage to seepage slopes (Engeman et al 2007).…”
Section: Economic Assessment Of Damagementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Because steephead ravines' wetland habitats are rare, they are not expressly enumerated among categories provided by King (1998). Thus, as for previous swine damage valuations for unique and rare wetlands in Florida (e.g., Engeman et al 2007Engeman et al , 2016b, we applied the median figure from King (1998) over freshwater wetland types (excluding prairie potholes) as an empirical "willingness to pay" value for restoration. The restoration cost estimate at the time of our final damage assessment in 2013, and after adjusting for 3% annual inflation rate since King (1998) presented the values, was $491,775/ha (King 1998;Zerbe and Dively 1994).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%