2014
DOI: 10.1590/1516-635x1603297-306
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Abstract: Scientific information on the welfare of broilers reared in alternative systems is scarce. The objective of this study was to assess the welfare of free-range broilers using the Welfare Quality® protocol. Free-range broilers reared in ten farms were observed, and measures were made in broilers of five of these farms. The collected data were transformed into scores (0-100), with higher scores indicating better welfare, except for emotional states. Prevalence percentages were calculated for the remaining data. M… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(13 citation statements)
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References 24 publications
(13 reference statements)
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“…Exposure to high ammonia levels (>10 ppm) is known to increase birds sensitivity to dust, while dust may irritate the respiratory tract, causing bronchitis ( David et al., 2015 ). In case of moderate-outdoor and outdoor-preferring Green-legged Partridges, their more frequent outdoor use is likely to minimize problems caused by dust and poor litter quality ( Sans et al., 2014 ). Sasso birds representing each of the ranging profiles were characterized by a higher occurrence of respiratory infections as compared to matching ranging profile of Green-legged Partridges.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The FPD risk factor may relate to the indoor environment, namely contact with litter of poor quality causing bacteriological contamination ( Sarica et al., 2014 ). Another risk factor for FPD is the quality of the outdoor area, where presence of stones or high humidity may damage the skin, which may subsequently be infected with bacteria ( Sans et al., 2014 ). Furthermore, estimates of the heritability of FPD are known to be moderate, between 20 and 30% ( EFSA, 2010 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Tuyttens et al showed that organic birds had better hock condition, leg health, and overall welfare than those in conventional production systems [30]. However, it was also reported that access to an outdoor area could influence the development of footpad dermatitis, which is probably explained by the fact that birds raised outside would be more likely to sustain foot injuries on the range that may cause skin damage [31,32]. It is difficult to compare these findings on the welfare status of broilers because of the very varying scoring systems, samples used, and the various rearing conditions of poultry.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Likewise, free-range broiler chickens raised in open fields can enjoy improvements in their physical activities and behavioral diversity ( El-Deek and El-Sabrout, 2019 ). Also, animal welfare assessment in free-range systems demonstrates better health and ambience, behavior and psychologic states, less pododermatitis and lameness, an absence of panting, increasing wing-flapping, and prevalence of positive emotional states ( Sans et al, 2014 ). Chickens have been genetically selected for outdoor systems using the so-called “slow growth” lines, which automatically confer higher production costs for the fundamental characteristic of these animals: They grow slower.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Free-range broiler chickens were slow-growing birds that could roam in open areas during the day. These farms showed a diversity of sizes, reflecting the greatest heterogeneity seen in the freerange production chain in comparison with the industrial production chain (Sans et al 2014). Moreover, these freerange farms exclusively targeted the Brazilian market, which maintained only basic AW requirements and regulations and did not adopt international AW standards.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%