2004
DOI: 10.1590/s0073-47212004000400006
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. Stages of gonadal development in females of "barba-ruça" shrimp (Artemesia longinarisDecapoda, Penaeidae). The stages of gonadal development for the female of "barba-ruça" shrimp (Artemesia longinaris Bate, 1888) were characterized based on histological analysis. Four stages (immature, almost mature, ripe and spawned) were determined according to the structure and arrangement of cells in the ovary. Each stage corresponds macroscopically to a characteristic color, except stages I (immature) and IV (sp… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(23 citation statements)
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“…This has also been observed for M. acanthurus (Carvalho and Pereira, 1981). Dumont and D'Incao (2004) observed changes in the ovaries from stage I (immature) to stage II (incipient maturation) regarding the increase in cell size and cell weight and the start of the production of yolk.…”
Section: Characterization Of the Male Gonadmentioning
confidence: 93%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This has also been observed for M. acanthurus (Carvalho and Pereira, 1981). Dumont and D'Incao (2004) observed changes in the ovaries from stage I (immature) to stage II (incipient maturation) regarding the increase in cell size and cell weight and the start of the production of yolk.…”
Section: Characterization Of the Male Gonadmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…According to Hartnoll (1974), the consecutive changes observed during gonadal development are important, because besides enabling an estimate of physiological sexual maturity (Oshiro et al, 1999;Silva and Oshiro, 2002a, b;Cobo and Fransozo, 2003), they permit detailed visualization of the reproductive cells (Dumont and D'Incao, 2004). Furthermore, these modifications are indispensable to characterize the reproductive dynamics and to manage adaptations for the preservation and/or commercial exploitation of the populations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ovaries categorized as immature ranged from thin, transparent strands to thicker ones. Mature ovaries were much larger and thicker, and varied from yellow to light orange or light green, and green to olive-green (Dumont & D'Incao, 2004). Size -frequency distributions were constructed separately to estimate the seasonality for males and females, using 10-mm TL size-intervals.…”
Section: A T E R Imentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Few previous investigations concerned on the reproduction and ovary maturation of A. longinaris from Southern Brazil (Nascimento 1981, Dumont & D´Incao 2004, Castillo et al 2007. Using variation of size at first maturity, a hypothesis of two different populations was stated for this species (Nascimento 1981).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the trait used to define morphological maturity was the presence of a spermatophore, which is presently known to be invalid as an indicator of ovarian maturity for this species, since females can carry spermatophores without being fully mature (Scelzo 1991). Dumont & D´Incao (2004) established a chromatic scale, based on ovarian microscopic traits, to identify stages of gonadal development of A. longinaris more accurately, providing a routine method to classify the ovaries. Recently, Castillo et al (2007) investigated trends in size at first maturity in populations inhabiting distribution limits of the species.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%