2003
DOI: 10.1590/s1678-91992003000100003
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Abstract: This investigation evaluated the epidemiological aspects of scorpion stings in different areas of Saudi Arabia. A total of 72,168 cases of scorpion stings recorded in Ministry of Health Medical Centers in 11 selected areas of Saudi Arabia were analyzed based on area, age, sex, time of sting, sting site, treatment outcome, time of year, and scorpion species. Stings occurred throughout the year; the highest frequency was in June (15.08%), the lowest in February (2.52%). Most patients were male (61.8%); the major… Show more

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Cited by 42 publications
(40 citation statements)
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“…Fourteen species have been identified in Saudi Arabia, with six of these recorded in Al-Jouf province. [2][3][4][7][8] The results of the present study indicate that 1449 scorpion stings were recorded in Al-Jouf province during two years (2005)(2006) with an average of 4 cases/1000 inhabitants annually. No deaths were recorded in spite of the high incidence of stings.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…Fourteen species have been identified in Saudi Arabia, with six of these recorded in Al-Jouf province. [2][3][4][7][8] The results of the present study indicate that 1449 scorpion stings were recorded in Al-Jouf province during two years (2005)(2006) with an average of 4 cases/1000 inhabitants annually. No deaths were recorded in spite of the high incidence of stings.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This finding is in agreement with the results of some investigations in other regions of Saudi Arabia, 5,9 ' 10 but not with others that reported deaths following scorpion stings in some areas of the Kingdom. 3,[11][12][13][14][15] Some studies reported that the mortality rate due to scorpion stings in Saudi Arabia was 3% between 1985 and 1993, 10,16 but was less than 0.05% in 1997. 3 Similar studies in Jordan and Morocco have shown a high rate of scorpion sting envenomation with several deaths.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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