2008
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.144.4.533
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Cited by 18 publications
(14 citation statements)
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“…A later amendment suggested adding an E for evolving (change in size, shape, surface, colour or sensation over time) [30]. Although some state that the D-criterion hinders the early detection of melanoma [31], as melanomas may be smaller than 6 mm [32][33][34], a large study of pigmented skin lesions revealed a clear increase in the percentage of melanomas once the limit of 6 mm was exceeded, concluding that the guideline of 6 mm is indeed useful [35]. An advantage of the ABCD criteria is that it makes it easier to distinguish between typical benign naevi and melanomas.…”
Section: Clinical Decision Aids Abcd(e) Criteriamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A later amendment suggested adding an E for evolving (change in size, shape, surface, colour or sensation over time) [30]. Although some state that the D-criterion hinders the early detection of melanoma [31], as melanomas may be smaller than 6 mm [32][33][34], a large study of pigmented skin lesions revealed a clear increase in the percentage of melanomas once the limit of 6 mm was exceeded, concluding that the guideline of 6 mm is indeed useful [35]. An advantage of the ABCD criteria is that it makes it easier to distinguish between typical benign naevi and melanomas.…”
Section: Clinical Decision Aids Abcd(e) Criteriamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Clinical diagnosis may be difficult, and although dermoscopy is routinely used by many, melanoma may even lack dermoscopic hallmarks in some patients [11, 15, 30]. New methods for diagnosis of melanoma are therefore continuously being developed [1].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Dermatoscopy is the mainstay of diagnosing pigmented skin lesions by proving its usefulness in multiple meta‐analyses and is used by dermatologists as well as primary care physicians . Therefore, the method is not only useful for dermatology residents but dermatoscopy may also be taught to medical students in the core medical curriculum, just as using the stethoscope.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%