1995
DOI: 10.1115/1.2794186
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Dynamic Models for Sideways Falls From Standing Height

Abstract: Despite our growing understanding of the importance of fall mechanics in the etiology of hip fracture, previous studies have largely ignored the kinematics and dynamics of falls from standing height. Beginning from basic principles, we estimated peak impact force on the greater trochanter in a sideways fall from standing height. Using a one degree-of-freedom impact model, this force is determined by the impact velocity of the hip, the effective mass of that part of the body that is moving prior to impact, and … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
55
1

Year Published

2006
2006
2015
2015

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 98 publications
(56 citation statements)
references
References 15 publications
0
55
1
Order By: Relevance
“…First, evidence suggests that sideways falls from standing (onto a rigid floor) generate impact forces that are just above the mean value required to fracture the elderly cadaveric femur. 13,18,19 Therefore, even a small reduction in impact force may prevent fractures. Second, while hip protectors have been shown to reduce fracture risk in clinical trials by as much as 50%, 20 those same devices reduce peak impact force by only 15-20% in laboratory testing.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…First, evidence suggests that sideways falls from standing (onto a rigid floor) generate impact forces that are just above the mean value required to fracture the elderly cadaveric femur. 13,18,19 Therefore, even a small reduction in impact force may prevent fractures. Second, while hip protectors have been shown to reduce fracture risk in clinical trials by as much as 50%, 20 those same devices reduce peak impact force by only 15-20% in laboratory testing.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Where α is the angle between the vertical and the projection of the shank on y-z plane; β is the angle between the shank and its projection on x-z plane; γ is the angle between the vertical and the projection of the trunk on y-z plane. The angle between the trunk and its projection on x-z plane, κ, is considered as a constant in a fall [9]. However, it may have different value in different fall depending on the initial conditions.…”
Section: Subject-specific Dynamics Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The mass (M) is the so-called effective mass, representing only the part of the body that has contribution to the impact force. The method for calculating the effective mass is described in [9] and the main formulas are summarized in Appendix C. The effective mass is related to the kinematic configuration of the body before the impact. Therefore, it is not a constant even for the same subject.…”
Section: Impact Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations